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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Applicability of Neuber’s Rule to the Analysis of Stress and Strain Concentration Under Creep Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Härkegård

Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7034 Trondheim, Norway

S. So̸rbo̸

Raufoss Technology Ltd, N-2831 Raufoss, Norway

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 120(3), 224-229 (Jul 01, 1998) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2812347 History: Received July 22, 1997; Revised September 30, 1997; Online November 27, 2007

Abstract

A differential form of Neuber’s rule, originally proposed by M. Chaudonneret, has been formulated for a generic viscoplastic notch problem, making extensive use of suitably normalised stress, strain and time. It has been shown that the stress-strain history at the root of a notch in a viscoplastic body can be determined directly from the elastic response, provided far-field viscoplastic strains can be neglected. Neuber’s rule has also been applied to the more general cases of stress and strain concentration at notches under (i) nominal creep conditions (constant nominal stress) and (ii) stress relaxation (constant nominal strain). Predictions are in good agreement with results from finite element analyses. Stress and strain concentration factors have been observed to approach stationary values after long-time loading. The stationary stress concentration factor under stress relaxation falls below that under nominal creep conditions.

Copyright © 1998 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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