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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Interfacial Stresses and Void Nucleation in Discontinuously Reinforced Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
T. C. Tszeng

Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 122(1), 86-92 (Jun 21, 1999) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.482770 History: Received June 30, 1997; Revised June 21, 1999
Copyright © 2000 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
The coordinates system and conventions for ellipsoidal inclusion. At a surface point P which makes angles (θ, ϕ) with axes 3 and 1, the outer normal from the surface has an angle ψ with the horizontal plane.
Grahic Jump Location
The distribution of interfacial specific stresses (interfacial stress divided by σ33A) as a function of the angle from the pole in a composite deformed elastically during uniaxial loading. The aspect ratio of the inclusion a=1 and 5, volume fraction f=0.1.
Grahic Jump Location
The distribution of normal stress and von Mises stress at the particle-matrix interface in a composite deformed plastically during uniaxial loading at a range of overall uniaxial stress σ33A. The aspect ratio of the inclusion a=1, volume fraction f=0.1.
Grahic Jump Location
The concentration factor C as a function of the effective strain for composites comprising spherical particles of volume fraction 0.1. σ11A22A=ρσ33A
Grahic Jump Location
The relationship between the maximum interfacial normal stress and the hydrostatic stress at several different levels of von Mises stress (labeled by the corresponding curves). All stresses are in MPa. The volume fraction of spherical particle is 0.1.
Grahic Jump Location
The relationship between the maximum interfacial normal stress and the von Mises stress at several different levels of hydrostatic stress (labeled by the corresponding curves). All stresses are in MPa. The volume fraction of spherical particle is 0.1.
Grahic Jump Location
The changing of interfacial von Mises at the pole and at the equator as functions of the effective plastic strain
Grahic Jump Location
The angles (θ12) defining the plastic zone at the interface are changing as the deformation proceeds
Grahic Jump Location
A diagram showing the comparison of the calculated nucleation loci for composites comprising spherical particles of volume fraction f=0.1 subjected to axisymmetric deformation σ11A22A=ρσ33A. Two levels of interfacial bonding strength are used.
Grahic Jump Location
A plot of the square root of nucleation strain (εN) as a function of macroscopic mean stress for composites comprising spherical particles of volume fraction f=0.1 subjected to axisymmetric deformation σ11A22A=ρσ22A. Two levels of interfacial bonding strength are used.
Grahic Jump Location
A plot of the nucleation strain (εN) for composites comprising ellipsoidal inclusions of a range of aspect ratio and volume fraction during uniaxial loading. The interfacial bonding strength is assumed to be 1000 MPa.

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