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TECHNICAL PAPERS

On the Energy Release Rate of Fatigued Composites Subjected to Compressive Overloads

[+] Author and Article Information
Assimina A. Pelegri, Diwakar N. Kedlaya

Rutgers—The State University of New Jersey, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8058

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 122(4), 443-449 (May 30, 2000) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1289140 History: Received April 10, 2000; Revised May 30, 2000
Copyright © 2000 by ASME
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References

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Schaff,  J. R., and Davidson,  B. D., 1997, “Life Prediction Methodology for Composite Structures: Part II–Spectrum Fatigue,” J. Compos. Mater., 31, pp. 158–181.
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Kam,  T. Y., Tsai,  S. Y., and Chu,  K. H., 1997, “Fatigue Reliability Analysis of Composite Laminates Under Spectrum Stress,” Int. J. Solids Struct., 34, pp. 1441–1461.
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Badaliance, R., Dill, H. D., and Potter, J. M., 1982, “Effects of Spectrum Variations on Fatigue Life of Composites,” Sixth Composite Materials: Testing and Design Conference, ASTM STP 787, pp. 274–286.
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O’Brien, T. K., 1982, “The Effect of Delamination on the Tensile Strength of Unnotched, Quasi-isotropic, Graphite/Epoxy Laminates,” Proceedings of the 1982 Joint Conference on Experimental Mechanics (SESA/JSME) Part I, Oahu-Maui, Hawaii, pp. 236–243.
Pelegri, Kardomateas, G. A., and Malik, B. U., 1997, “The Fatigue Growth of Internal Delaminations Under Compressive Loading of Crossply Composite Plates,” Compos. Mater. Fatigue Fract., ASTM STP 1285, 6, pp. 143–161.
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Figures

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(a) Schematic of the electronic TeLe-Microscopic (TLM) system, and (b) the testing center
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Configuration of a delaminated specimen used in axial fatigue tests
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Delamination fatigue growth of [0]24#3(εmean=1.58×10−3) and [0/90]12#1,[0/90]12#2 (εmean=1.60×10−3 and εmean=1.32×10−3, respectively) IM7-G/8552 graphite/ep specimens. Every block of 20,000 cycles was followed by an overload block of 8-20 cycles.
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The number of overload cycles (at −2.90×10−3 strain min) experienced by [0]24#3, beginning at number of cycles indicated on the x-axis
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Picture of fiber bridging resulting at the junction of two parallel cracks in [0]24#3 at 260 k cycles. The parallel crack formed at 140 k cycles and merged with the main crack at 220 k. Both cracks appear to be located between the 4th and 5th layer of the sample.
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Second of the five parallel cracks found in [0]24#3. Picture was taken at 260 k cycles. The upper crack is the main crack, located between layers 4 and 5. The second crack formed at 200 k cycles.
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The number of overload cycles (at −3.13×10−3 strain min) experienced by [0/90]12#1, beginning at number of cycles indicated on the x-axis
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3D schematic representation of the through the width delamination path trajectory in [0/90]12#1 after 20 k cycles, including kinks (intralayer cracks) and kink angles
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A kink at the tip of the delamination in [0/90]12#1. The crack starts between 4th–5th interface and breaks through the 3rd–4th interface where it continues to grow. Picture is taken after 20 k cycles. This kink is at the left-hand side of the initial delamination (image is inverted) and diverges at an angle of −65 deg from the primary path trajectory.
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The number of overload cycles (at −2.58×10−3 strain min) experienced by [0/90]12#2, beginning at number of cycles indicated on the x-axis
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3D schematic representation of the through the width delamination path trajectory in [0/90]12#2 after 20 k cycles, including kinks (intralayer cracks) and kink angles
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Picture of the left-hand side of the delamination in [0/90]12#2 after kinking. The crack starts between 4th–5th interface and breaks through the 3rd–4th interface where it continues to grow. Picture is taken after 20 k cycles. This kink is at the left-hand side of the initial delamination (image is inverted) and diverges at an angle of −77 deg from the primary path trajectory.
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Numerical simulations of graphite/ep., h/T=4/24 specimens subjected compressive loading at three different strain levels
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Numerical simulations indicating the behavior of graphite/ep., h/T=4/24 composites subjected to compressive overloads at three different strain levels
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Growth behavior graphite/ep. specimens subjected to compressive loading. Three different delamination positions h/T are mapped, i.e., 4/29=0.138,4/24=0.1667, and 4/15=0.267.
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Growth behavior graphite/ep. specimens subjected to compressive overloads for h/T=4/29=0.138,4/24=0.1667, and 4/15=0.267. The effect of overloads diminishes as the delamination length increases.

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