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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Microstructure Characterization of Dislocation Wall Structure in Aluminum Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Gan, J. S. Vetrano, M. A. Khaleel

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 124(3), 297-301 (Jun 10, 2002) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1479178 History: Received December 10, 2001; Revised March 06, 2002; Online June 10, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

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Winther,  G., Hensen,  D. J., and Hansen,  N., 1957. “Dense Dislocation Walls and Microbands Aligned With Slip Planes-Theoretical Considerations,” Acta Mater., 45(12), p. 5059.
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Hirsch, P. B., Howie A., Nicholson R. B., Pashley, D. W., and Whelan M. J., 1965, Electron Microscopy of Thinn Crystals, Butterworths, London, (1965).
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
The sample geometry of the single crystal aluminum and the tensile test setup used in this work (courtesy of Lyle Levin at the National Institute of Standard and Technology)
Grahic Jump Location
Low magnification TEM picture showing dislocation cell structure developed in a single crystal aluminum tensile deformed (15% strain). The tensile direction (TD=[−14,16,−13]) and the trace of slip planes (dashed lines) along with tensile axis (dot) in crystal-graphic orientation (triangle) are shown in the box.
Grahic Jump Location
TEM image showing details of dislocation cell structure along the primary direction (the letters mark the positions where misorientation angles were measured)
Grahic Jump Location
Stereo pairs of TEM microphotographs showing three-dimensional dislocation arrangement in cell boundaries along primary direction, shown in Fig. 3 (ABCD), for a 15% tensile strained single crystal aluminum. The pictures were taken at a diffraction condition of g=〈200〉.
Grahic Jump Location
TEM microphotographs showing Burgers vector analysis for the dislocations in the cell boundary along the primary direction. On the left there are cell boundaries; each contains one set of dislocation array as marked (b=(a0/2)[110],(a0/2)[−101] and (a0/2)[101]). On the right the cell boundary has two sets of dislocation array (b=(a0/2)[101] and b=(a0/2)[0−11]).
Grahic Jump Location
TEM microphotographs showing Burgers vector analysis for 15% strained single crystal aluminum. The dislocations in the cell boundary along primary slip contain two sets of Burgers vector (b=(a0/2)[110] and (a0/2)[101]).
Grahic Jump Location
TEM image showing details of dislocation cell structure along the secondary slip direction (the letters mark the positions where misorientation angles were measured)
Grahic Jump Location
TEM microphotographs showing Burgers vector analysis for the dislocations in the cell boundary along the secondary direction. On the left, the cell boundary on top contains two sets of Burgers vector (b=(a0/2)[110] and (a0/2)[0−11]) and the cell boundary on bottom has only one set dislocation array (b=(a0/2)[−110]). On the right which is the cell boundary marked as PM in Fig. 7, there are two sets of dislocation arrays (b=(a0/2)[−101] and (a0/2)[0−11]).

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