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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Finite Element Modeling of Chip Formation in the Domain of Negative Rake Angle Cutting

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. Ohbuchi

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto, 860-8555, Japan

T. Obikawa

Department of Mechanical and Control Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-Okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8552, Japan

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 125(3), 324-332 (Jul 10, 2003) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1590999 History: Received February 06, 2002; Revised April 10, 2003; Online July 10, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Partially formed chips with negative rake. Cutting conditions: workpiece, 0.45%C carbon steel (S45C); tool, (a) cBN, (b) diamond; rake angle, −45°; cutting speed, (a) 5 μm/s, (b) 20 m/s; undeformed chip thickness, 0.05 mm.
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Chip formation with different rake angles. Cutting conditions: workpiece, 0.45%C carbon steel (S45C); tool, diamond; rake angle, (a) −15°, (b) −20° and (c) −30°; cutting speed, 10 m/s; undeformed chip thickness, (a) 0.05 mm, (b) 0.07 mm, and (c) 0.04 mm.
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Schematic of typical chip formation with a stagnant region
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Upper bound analysis of chip formation with and without stagnant region. Lines of discontinuity are drawn on chip photomicrographs. (a) −15° and (b) −45°.
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Horizontal distance between the tips of stagnant region and tool
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Partially formed chip calculated for a rake angle of −45°. Cutting conditions are the same as in Fig. 1(b) except workpiece is 0.93%C carbon steel SK-5.
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Comparison of partially formed chips calculated and experimentally obtained for a rake angle of −60°. Cutting conditions: workpiece, (a) 0.93%C carbon steel SK-5, (b) 0.45%C carbon steel S45C; tool, diamond; cutting speed, 20 m/s; undeformed chip thickness, 0.075 mm.
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Growth of serrated chip
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Change of temperature distribution with cutting length
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Chip formation for a little smaller undeformed chip thickness. Cutting conditions are the same as in Fig. 5 except the undeformed chip thickness is 0.01 mm.
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Chip formation for much smaller undeformed chip thickness. Cutting conditions are the same as in Fig. 5 except the undeformed chip thickness is 0.002 mm.
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Chip formation for slower cutting speed. Cutting conditions are the same as in Fig. 5 except cutting speed is 2 m/s.
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Chip formation for much slower cutting speed. Cutting conditions are the same as in Fig. 5 except cutting speed is 1 m/s.
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Types of chip formation and the critical cutting conditions on V-d plane for a rake angle of −45°
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Critical cutting speed. Cutting conditions are the same as in Fig. 5 except for rake angle, cutting speed and undeformed chip thickness.

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