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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Comparison of Two Self-Consistent Models to Predict the Cyclic Behavior of Polycrystals

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Abdul-Latif

L3M, IUT de Tremblay, 93290 Tremblay-en-France, France

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 126(1), 62-69 (Jan 22, 2004) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1633572 History: Received February 10, 2003; Revised July 23, 2003; Online January 22, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Schematic representation of the employed (a) uniaxial, (b) biaxial, and (c) triaxial loading paths
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Comparison between the Cailletaud’s model predictions using the 40, 88, and 200 gains aggregates and the experimental result of the stabilized cycle for over-aged state of Waspaloy in tension-compression (TC)
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Effect of the aggregate type on the slip heterogeneity within the 40, 88, and 200-grain aggregates under tension-compression (TC) in full kinematic hardening (FKH) case using the two models
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Effect of the kinematic hardening state (full (FKH) and zero (0KH) kinematic hardening) on the slip heterogeneity (γac) within the 200-grain aggregate in TC
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Under TT90, comparison between the experimental results and predictions at steady state in the case of (a) under-aged state of Waspaloy (UA) and (b) 316L stainless steel
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Effect of the aggregate type on the slip heterogeneity within the 40, 88, and 200-grain aggregates under TT90 in full kinematic hardening (FKH) case using the two models
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Effect of the cyclic loading path (TC and TT90) on the slip heterogeneity within the 200-grain aggregate using the two models
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Effect of the kinematic hardening state (full (FKH) and zero (0KH) kinematic hardening) on the slip heterogeneity (γac) within the 200-grain aggregate in TT90
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Predicted evolutions of (a) accumulated slip and (b) intragranular isotropic hardening, under TC and TT90, for 316L within the 200-grain aggregate using both models
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Evolution of the maximum equivalent predicted overall stress of the models under triaxial out-of-phase cyclic loading in full (FKH) and zero (0KH) kinematic hardening cases using the 40 and 200-grain aggregate for 316L
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Distribution of γac under triaxial out-of-phase cyclic loading of each models within the 40 and the 200-grain aggregates in the case of (a) full (FKH) and (b ) zero (0KH) kinematic hardenings
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Comparison between the two models predicted evolutions of intragranular isotropic hardening (Rs) and shear stress (τs) for 316L under triaxial loading

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