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RESEARCH PAPERS

A Slip-Based Model for Strength Evolution During Cyclic Loading

[+] Author and Article Information
H. S. Turkmen

Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey

M. P. Miller, P. R. Dawson

Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853

J. C. Moosbrugger

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 126(4), 329-338 (Nov 09, 2004) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1789967 History: Received October 29, 2003; Revised March 29, 2004; Online November 09, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Schematic representation of the effective stress–accumulated effective plastic strain (∫D̄pdt) response of 304L stainless steel (SS304L) subjected to monotonic (M), nonproportional multiaxial (N), uniaxial cyclic (U), proportional multiaxial (P) straining histories
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Hysteresis loops from the multiple-step uniaxial experiment (MSU) conducted on SS304L. The experimental conditions are given in Table 1.
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Strain path during the multiple-step axial torsional experiment (MSAT) conducted on SS304L. The experimental conditions are given in Table 1.
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Experimental shear and axial stress response from the MSAT experiment
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The strain path during the multiple phase axial torsional experiment (MPAT)
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The stress response from the MPAT experiment. The innermost loops are from the 0-deg experiments and the outermost from the 90 deg.
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Peak axial stresses for all experiments. The angles from the MPAT experiment are shown. The data are represented by the symbols. The lines are drawn as guides.
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Peak shear stresses for the multiaxial experiments
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Schematic representation of the evolution of the slip-system hardening rate with accumulated shear strain on the α slip system. The solid line illustrates the introduction of the parameter, f, requiring the accumulated shear strain to attain a minimum (critical) value before the α-slip system contributes to the crystal shearing rate used in the evolution equation for the crystal strength, g.
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The net-crystal shearing-rate magnitude for one crystal in the aggregate during uniaxial and axial torsional nonproportional straining histories. The nonproportional angle, θ, varies as shown.
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The predicted stress response during the MSU experiment
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The predicted stress response during the MSAT experiment
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The predicted stress response during the MPAT experiment
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The peak axial stress levels
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The peak shear stress amplitudes
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Slip-system shearing-rate activity for a typical crystal in the aggregate over a uniaxial straining cycle and axial torsional straining cycles with various degrees of nonproportionality (θ). The line width indicates the shearing-rate magnitude.
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Simulation results employing finite elements as the micro-macro linking assumption

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