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RESEARCH PAPERS

Creep Behavior of Al-Si Die-Cast Alloys

[+] Author and Article Information
Tim Jaglinski, Roderic Lakes

Materials Science Program and Engineering Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 126(4), 378-383 (Nov 09, 2004) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1789953 History: Received May 13, 2003; Revised May 17, 2004; Online November 09, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

Ishikawa,  K., Maehara,  M., and Kobayashi,  Y., 2002, “Mechanical Modeling and Microstructural Observation of Pure Aluminum Crept Under Constant Stress,” Mater. Sci. Eng., A, A322, pp. 153–158.
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Kim,  W., Yeon,  J. H., and Lee,  J. C., 2000, “Superplastic Deformation of Spray-Deposited Hyper-Eutectic Al-25Si Alloy,” J. Alloys Compd., 308, pp. 237–243.
Bae,  D. H., and Ghosh,  A. K., 2002, “Cavity Formation and Early Growth in a Superplastic Al-Mg Alloy,” Acta Mater., 50, pp. 511–523.
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Ma,  Z. Y., and Tjong,  S. C., 2000, “High-Temperature Creep Behavior of SiC Particulate Reinforced Al-Fe-V-Si Alloy Composite,” Mater. Sci. Eng., A, A278, pp. 5–15.
Nabarro, F. R. N., and de Villiers, H. L., 1995, The Physics of Creep, Taylor and Francis, London.
Kalpakjian, S., 1997, Manufacturing Processes for Engineering Materials, Addison Wesley Longman.
Lakes, R. S., 1998, Viscoelastic Solids, CRC Press.
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
(a) Cavity coalescence along lines perpendicular to stress direction in a fractured Al-17Si creep specimen; (b) Sub-fracture crack due to the coalescence of cavities in the eutectic alloy; (c) Enlarged view of the crack tip showing crack growth into new cavities; and (d) Further enlargement of the crack tip showing cracked silicon particles and void growth on the Si-Al interfaces aiding crack propagation.
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Example of a cracked silicon particle in the Al-17Si alloy: The gray areas are primary silicon phases; and (b) example of a cracked silicon particle in the eutectic Al-Si alloy: The gray areas are primary silicon phases.
Grahic Jump Location
Master curve obtained for the Al-17Si alloy from time-temperature superposition to the lowest test temperature (220 C). X: Original results from 31 MPa-220°C ⋄: Shifted from 31 MPa-280C ▵: Shifted from 31 MPa-260C.
Grahic Jump Location
Master curves obtained for the eutectic alloy from time-temperature superposition to the lowest test temperature. •: Tested at 31 MPa/220°C, ▵: Shifted from 31 MPa/260°C, □: Shifted from 31 MPa/280°C, ▪: Tested at 42MPa/260°C, ⋄: Shifted from 42 MPa/280°C, X: Tested at 56 MPa/220°C, □: Shifted from 56 MPa/260°C.
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Creep results obtained for the eutectic Al-Si alloy for 220°C. Curves with X’s are to fracture, those without were stopped due to time constraints. Curve-fits are of the form shown in Eq. (2); (b) creep results obtained for the eutectic Al-Si alloy for 260° and 280°C. Curves with X’s are to fracture, those without were stopped due to time constraints. Curve-fits are of the form shown in Eq. (2); (c) comparison of creep results between the eutectic and Al-17Si alloys at the same stress of 32MPa and various temperatures, X indicates specimen rupture; and (d) comparison of creep results between the eutectic and B390 Al-Si alloys at the same stress of 32MPa and various temperatures.
Grahic Jump Location
Micrograph of a fractured Al-17Si creep specimen near the fracture surface demonstrating the presence of gas porosity and aluminum beads and their possible influence on crack growth
Grahic Jump Location
(a) As-cast microstructure of the eutectic Al-Si alloy; (b) as-cast microstructure of the B390 commercial alloy; and (c) as-cast microstructure of the Al-17Si alloy.

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