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RESEARCH PAPERS

The Effect of Mean Stress on the Fatigue Behavior of Woven-Roving Glass Fiber-Reinforced Polyester Subjected to Torsional Moments

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohamed N. Nasr1

Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering,  Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt

M. N. Abouelwafa, A. Gomaa, A. Hamdy, E. Morsi

Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering,  Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt

1

Corresponding author: Mechanical Engineering Dept. (JHE-316), McMaster University, 1280 Main St. West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada (L8S 4L7). Fax: +1-905-5727944, e-mail: ahmedmn@mcmaster.ca

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 127(3), 301-309 (Mar 25, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1925285 History: Received August 23, 2004; Revised March 25, 2005

The effect of torsional mean stress on the fatigue behavior of glass fiber-reinforced polyester (GFRP) is studied by testing thin-walled, woven-roving tubular specimens with two fiber orientations, [±45°]2s and [0,90°]2s, at negative stress ratios (R),R=1,0.75,0.5,0.25, 0. The [±45°]2s specimens were found to have higher fatigue strength than the [0,90°]2s specimens at all stress ratios. This is attributed to the difference in local stress components, the [±45°]2s specimens being subjected to tension-compression local stress components, while the [0,90°]2s specimens being subjected to pure local shear stress. For the studied stress ratios; the mean stress component had a detrimental effect on the amplitude component for the [±45°]2s specimens; while it was ineffective for the [0,90°]2s specimens in a certain region in the mean-amplitude diagram, region (1), then it had a detrimental effect in the rest of the diagram, region (2). The SN curves for positive stress ratios were extrapolated from those for negative stress ratios, which were found experimentally, for the [0,90°]2s specimens. The positive stress ratio points, having the same local stress state as the negative ones, showed an acceptable behavior tending to decrease the amplitude component for the same life.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

General layout of testing machine

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Figure 2

Nominal dimensions of used specimens (mm)

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Figure 3

Torsional S–N curves of [±45°]2s specimens

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Figure 4

Torsional S–N curves of [0,90°]2s specimens

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Figure 5

Mean-amplitude diagram of [±45°]2s specimens at different lives

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Figure 6

Mean-amplitude diagrams of [0,90°]2s specimens at different lives

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Figure 7

(b) vs stress ratio (R)

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Figure 8

Torsional S–N curves of [±45°]2s and [0,90°]2s specimens at different stress ratios

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