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RESEARCH PAPERS: Special Issue on Time-Dependent Behaviors of Polymer Matrix Composites and Polymers

Computational Micromechanics for High-Temperature Constitutive Equations of Polymer-Matrix Composites With Oxidation Reaction, Damage, and Degradation

[+] Author and Article Information
Su Su Wang, Xiaohong Chen

Composite Engineering and Applications Center (CEAC), and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-0931

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 128(1), 81-89 (Jul 06, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2132377 History: Received November 02, 2004; Revised July 06, 2005

The proper determination of high-temperature constitutive properties and damage of polymer-matrix composites (PMC) in an aggressive environment is critical in high-speed aircraft and propulsion material development, structural integrity, and long-term life prediction. In this paper, a computational micromechanics study is conducted to obtain high-temperature constitutive properties of the PMC undergoing simultaneous thermal oxidation reaction, microstructural damage, and thermomechanical loading. The computational micromechanics approach follows the recently developed irreversible thermodynamic theory for polymer composites with reaction and microstructural change under combined chemical, thermal, and mechanical loading. Proper microstructural modeling of the PMC is presented to ensure that reaction activities, thermal and mechanical responses of the matrix, fibers, and fiber-matrix interface are fully addressed. A multiscale homogenization theory is used in conjunction with a finite element representation of material and reaction details to determine continuous evolution of composite microstructure change and associated degradation of the mechanical and physical properties. Numerical examples are given on a commonly used G30-500/PMR15 composite for illustration.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figure 3

(Color) Oxygen concentration distribution c̃(Ox) in G30-500/PMR-15 composite subject to thermal oxidation at T=316°C∕600°F and t=6s: (a) D0(l)∕D0(m)=100 with D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s, (b) D0(l)∕D0(m)=1 with D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s, (c) D0(l)∕D0(m)=100 with D0(m)=1.09×10−11m2∕s, and (d) D0(l)∕D0(m)=1 with D0(m)=1.09×10−11m2∕s

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Figure 4

(Color) Mass loss m̃ in G30-500/PMR-15 composite subject to thermal oxidation at 316°C∕600°F(t=1hr): (a) D0(l)∕D0(m)=100 with D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s, (b) D0(l)∕D0(m)=1 with D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s, (c) D0(l)∕D0(m)=100 with D0(m)=1.09×10−11m2∕s, and (d) D0(l)∕D0(m)=1 with D0(m)=1.09×10−11m2∕s

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Figure 5

(Color) Mass loss m̃ in G30-500/PMR-15 composite subject to thermal oxidation at 316°C∕600°F(t=100hr): (a) D0(l)∕D0(m)=100 with D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s, (b) D0(l)∕D0(m)=1 with D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s, (c) D0(l)∕D0(m)=100 with D0(m)=1.09×10−11m2∕s, and (d) D0(l)∕D0(m)=1 with D0(m)=1.09×10−11m2∕s

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Figure 6

(Color) Mass loss m̃ in G30-500/PMR-15 composite subject to thermal oxidation at 316°C∕600°F(t=600hr): (a) D0(l)∕D0(m)=100 with D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s, (b) D0(l)∕D0(m)=1 with D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s, (c) D0(l)∕D0(m)=100 with D0(m)=1.09×10−11m2∕s, and (d) D0(l)∕D0(m)=1 with D0(m)=1.09×10−11m2∕s

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Figure 9

Changes in effective mechanical and oxidation-induced strains with time for G30-500/PMR-15 composite during thermal oxidation at 316°C∕600°F(D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s)

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Figure 10

Effective stress versus mechanical strain in G30-500/PMR-15 composite during thermal oxidation at 316°C∕600°F(D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s)

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Figure 11

Oxidation-induced damage evolution in G30-500/PMR-15 composite at 316°C∕600°F(D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s)

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Figure 1

Micromechanics model for transverse oxidation in fiber composite: (a) Periodical composite microstructure and two-scale coordinate systems and (b) Representative volume element with oxygen diffusion and reaction

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Figure 2

(Color) Finite element model for computational micromechanics analysis of composite transverse oxidation

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Figure 7

(Color) Oxidation reaction-induced stresses (Pa) in G30-500/PMR-15 composite subject to thermal oxidation at T=316°C∕600°F and t=100hr(D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s): (a) σ11, (b) σ22, (c) σ12, and (d) σ33

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Figure 8

Applied stress versus oxidation time in G30-500/PMR-15 composite during thermal oxidation at 316°C∕600°F(D0(m)=1.09×10−10m2∕s)

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