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SPECIAL SECTION ON DAMPING OF SHAPE MEMORY ALLOYS, COMPOSITES, AND FOAMS

Effect of H-Doping on Damping Capacity of Various NiTi-Based Alloys at kHz Frequencies

[+] Author and Article Information
B. Coluzzi, A. Biscarini, G. Mazzolai

University of Perugia,  Department of Physics, Via A. Pascoli 5, 06100 Perugia, Italy

F. M. Mazzolai1

University of Perugia,  Department of Physics, Via A. Pascoli 5, 06100 Perugia, Italyfabio.mazzolai@fisica.unipg.it

A. Tuissi

 Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi, CNR-IENI, Lecco, Italy

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 128(3), 254-259 (Mar 27, 2006) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2203202 History: Received August 31, 2005; Revised March 27, 2006

The internal friction Q1 and the Young’s modulus E of NiTi based alloys have been measured as a function of temperature after various thermomechanical and hydrogen-doping treatments given to the materials. Hydrogen is found to play a major role introducing tall damping peaks associated with Snoek-type and H-twin boundary relaxations. Levels of Q1 as high as 0.08 have been detected, which are among the highest to date measured in metal alloy systems. For appropriate alloy compositions, these peaks occur at around room temperature (for acoustical frequencies), thus providing a good opportunity to reduce machinery vibrations and noise pollution. In the paper, the conditions are highlighted under which maximum efficiency can be reached in the conversion of mechanical energy into heat.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Temperature dependence of the internal friction (Q−1), Young’s modulus (E), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of the alloy Ni50.8Ti49.2 prior vacuum-annealed (VA), water-quenched (WQ), aged (30min at 673K) (AG), and then eventually hydrogen-doped (HD) as measured at kilohertz frequencies. Curve 1 is taken from Ref. 28, curves 3 and 5 from Ref. 26. Curves 6 and 7 are new measurement runs carried out with a sample water quenched and H doped in the course of a previous experiment [26] and kept at room temperature for long times.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Temperature dependence of the internal friction (Q−1), Young’s modulus (E), and DSC of the Ni49Ti51 alloy, as measured at kilohertz frequencies in WQ, VA, and VA+HD states of the material. Curve 1 is from Ref. 36.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Temperature dependence of the internal friction (Q−1) and Young’s modulus (E), and DSC of the quaternary alloy (Ni47,Cu3)(Ti40,Hf10) as measured during cooling for the indicated states, frequencies, and hydrogen contents nH(nH=H∕Me)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Temperature dependence of the internal friction (Q−1), Young’s modulus (E), and DSC of the ternary alloy (Ni30,Cu20)Ti50 as measured during cooling for the reported states, frequencies and hydrogen contents nH(nH=H∕Me). Data referring to the WQ and WQ+HD states are from Ref. 31.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Dependence of the height (QM−1) of the H-Snoek relaxation PH on the hydrogen content nH(nH=H∕Me) for the alloys investigated in the present and in previous works (26-27,30-38). α and β are the H solid solution and hydride phase, respectively.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Dependence of the height (QM−1) of the H-twin boundary interaction peak PTWH on the hydrogen content nH(nH=H∕Me) for the alloys investigated in the present and in previous (26-27,30-38)

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