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SPECIAL SECTION ON DAMPING OF SHAPE MEMORY ALLOYS, COMPOSITES, AND FOAMS

Seismic Vibration Control Using Superelastic Shape Memory Alloys

[+] Author and Article Information
Jason McCormick

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering,  Georgia Institute of Technology, 790 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA, 30332-0355jason.mccormick@ce.gatech.edu

Reginald DesRoches1

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering,  Georgia Institute of Technology, 790 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA, 30332-0355reginald.desroches@ce.gatech.edu

Davide Fugazza

European School for Advanced Studies in Reduction of Seismic Risk (ROSE School), and Dipartimento di Meccanica Strutturale,  Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia, Italydavide.fugazza@samcef.com

Ferdinando Auricchio

European School for Advanced Studies in Reduction of Seismic Risk (ROSE School), and Dipartimento di Meccanica Strutturale,  Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia, Italyauricchio@unipv.it

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 128(3), 294-301 (Apr 03, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2203109 History: Received August 31, 2005; Revised April 03, 2006

Superelastic NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) wires and bars are studied to determine their damping and recentering capability for applications in the structural control of buildings subjected to earthquake loadings. These studies improve the knowledge base in regard to the use of SMAs in seismic design and retrofit of structures. The results show that the damping properties of austenitic SMAs are generally low. However, the residual strain obtained after loading to 6% strain is typically <0.75%. In general, it is shown that large diameters bars perform as well as wire specimens used in non-civil-engineering applications. The results of a small-scale shake table test are then presented as a proof of concept study of a SMA cross-bracing system. These results are verified through analytical nonlinear time history analysis. Finally, a three-story steel frame implementing either a traditional steel buckling-allowed bracing system or a SMA bracing system is analyzed analytically to determine if there is an advantage to using a SMA bracing system. The results show that the SMA braces improve the response of the braced frames.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Stress-strain curves for 0.254mm(0.01in.) diameter NiTi shape memory alloys tested at (a) 0.025Hz and (b) 1.0Hz loading rates

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Figure 2

Stress-strain curves for 12.7mm(0.5in.) diameter NiTi shape memory alloys tested at (a) 0.025Hz and (b) 1.0Hz loading rates (13)

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Figure 3

Cyclic properties comparison of NiTi shape memory alloys: (a) residual strain and (b) equivalent viscous damping

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Figure 4

Proof-of-concept shake table model with 0.254mm(0.01in.) diameter SMA braces

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Figure 5

Analytical displacement time history of the roof for the proof-of-concept model undergoing the LA21 ground motion scaled to 1.0PGA

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Figure 6

Elevation and plan view of the three-story frame

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Figure 7

Detail of the innovative SMA braces in the three-story frame

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Figure 8

Force-displacement relationship for the SMA braces

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Figure 9

Displacement time history of the roof experienced in the three-story frame excited by the LA06 record

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Figure 10

Force-displacement relationship experienced by one of the bottom braces excited by the LA06 record: (a) steel brace and (b) SMA brace

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Figure 11

(a) Maximum interstory drift and (b) residual drift of the top floor exhibited by the three-story steel braced frame with either conventional steel braces, innovative SMA braces, or innovative SMA braces with a reduced cross-sectional area

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