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SPECIAL SECTION ON DAMPING OF SHAPE MEMORY ALLOYS, COMPOSITES, AND FOAMS

Micromechanical Modeling of Particulate Composites for Damping of Acoustic Waves

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael R. Haberman1

 Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech Lorraine, 2 rue Marconi, 57070-Metz, France, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,  Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405, and Laboratoire de Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Institute Supérieur de Génie Mécanique, UMR 7554 CNRS,  Université de Metz, 57045 Metz, Francemhaberma@georgiatech-metz.fr

Yves H. Berthelot

 Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech Lorraine, 2 rue Marconi, 57070-Metz, France and Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,  Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405

Mohammed Cherkaoui

 Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech Lorraine, 2 rue Marconi, 57070-Metz, France, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,  Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405, and Laboratoire de Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Institute Supérieur de Génie Mécanique, UMR 7554 CNRS,  Université de Metz, 57045 Metz, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 128(3), 320-329 (Nov 21, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2204943 History: Received August 23, 2005; Revised November 21, 2005

The self-consistent (SC) micromechanical model of a composite containing coated micro-inclusions, originally proposed in the static regime by Cherkaoui (1994, J. Eng. Mater. Technol., 116, 274–278), is implemented in the quasistatic regime by the introduction of frequency dependent complex moduli for the matrix material. The original model is improved by using dilute strain concentration tensor (DSCT) formulation. It is shown that these concentration tensors can be used to approximate effective composite behavior of composites containing ellipsoidal inclusions having a known orientation distribution or of composites containing multiple types of coated inclusions. The DSCT formulation is also shown to be capable of modeling the effects of multiple scales (submicron-meso-macro), as well as that of a distribution of inclusion coating thicknesses. Various potential material modeling applications are verified through comparison with experimental data in the literature. Notably, the DSCT SC model is applied in the quasistatic regime for calculation of acoustic transmission loss of a slab of viscoelastic composite submerged in water for the range of frequencies between 0100kHz and compared with experimental data of Baird (1999, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 105, 1527–1538).

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic representation of SC dilute strain concentration tensor approximation

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Figure 2

Compressional and shear wave speeds and Q−1 values as a function of volume fraction calculated using the DSCT SC model and Berryman’s model (9) for the case of prolate rock inclusions in water, where a∕b=a∕c=10

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Figure 3

Compressional and shear wave speeds and Q−1 values as a function of the volume fraction calculated using the DSCT SC model and Berryman’s model (9) for the case of oblate rock inclusions in water, where a∕b=1 and a∕c=10

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Figure 4

Variation of the attenuation coefficient as a function of the azimuthal angle for a glass∕polymer composite with varying degrees of anisotropy. The volume fraction of prolate inclusions φ=10%, a∕b=a∕c=5; frequency inspected f=25kHz.

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Figure 5

Composite material studied by Ledbetter and Datta (image taken from Ref. 10). The material consists of a nonuniform distribution of submicron prolate SiC particles in an aluminum matrix.

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Figure 6

Transmission loss calculated using SC and DSCT SC with experimental data from Ref. 7

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