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SPECIAL SECTION ON DAMPING OF SHAPE MEMORY ALLOYS, COMPOSITES, AND FOAMS

Shape Memory Alloys Cyclic Behavior: Experimental Study and Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
P. Malécot1

Laboratoire de Mécanique Appliquée, FEMTO-ST Université de Franche-Comté, Besancon, France

C. Lexcellent, E. Foltête, M. Collet

Laboratoire de Mécanique Appliquée, FEMTO-ST Université de Franche-Comté, Besancon, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 128(3), 335-345 (Mar 01, 2006) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2204947 History: Received August 30, 2005; Revised March 01, 2006

Shape memory alloys (SMA) are good candidates for being integrated in composite laminates where they can be used as passive dampers, strain sensors, stiffness or shape drivers. In order to improve the SMA modeling and develop the use of these alloys in structural vibration control, better understandings of cyclic behavior and thermal dissipation are needed. The present study investigates experimentally the cyclic behavior of SMA and more particularly, the influence of strain rates on three different materials. The thermal dissipation aspect is also studied using an infrared camera. A phenomenological model based on the RL model (Raniecki, B., Lexcellent, C., 1994, “RL Models of Pseudoelasticity and Their Specification for Shape Memory Solids.  ” Eur. J. A/Solids, 13, pp. 21–50) is then presented with the intention of modeling the behavior’s alterations due to the cycling. By introducing the thermodynamic first principle, a study of the heat equation is developed in order to predict the temperature evolution during a cyclic tensile test. Furthermore, in order to model the damping effect created by the hysteresis phenomenon and the stiffness variation due to the phase transformation, an equivalent nonlinear complex Young’s modulus is introduced. This notion usually used for viscoelastic materials is adapted here to SMA. Moreover, the impact of cycling on the equivalent modulus is presented. As a conclusion, a numerical results panel obtained with the phenomenological cyclic SMA model, the heat equation, and the equivalent complex Young modulus is presented.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Ni–Ti cyclic test at 25°C, ε•=10−4s−1

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Figure 2

σAM and σMA variation with the number of cycles for Ni–Ti

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Figure 3

Ni–Ti dynamic test at 25°C and 5Hz with Δε1=1.4%, Δε2=2.8%, Δε3=4.2%, Δε4=5.6%

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Figure 4

Ni–Ti dynamic test (5Hz): temperature variation

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Figure 5

Cu–Al–Be(1) cyclic test at 22°C, ε̇=10−4s−1

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Figure 6

Cu–Al–Be(1) stabilized cycles comparison after 100cycles

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Figure 7

Cu–Al–Be(1) temperature variation: (a) test at 10−4s−1; (b) test at 10−2s−1

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Figure 8

Cu–Al–Be(1) temperature variation: (a) test at 10−1s−1; (b) test at 2×10−1s−1

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Figure 9

Cu–Al–Be(2) quasistatic cyclic test at 22°C

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Figure 10

Cu–Al–Be(2) stabilized cycle’s comparison after 100cycles

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Figure 11

Cu–Al–Be(2) temperature variation: (a) test at 10−4s−1; (b) test at 10−3s−1

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Figure 12

Cu–Al–Be(2) temperature variation: (a) test at 10−2s−1; (b) test at 10−1s−1

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Figure 13

Simplified nonlinear model of the adiabatic transition

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Figure 14

Ni–Ti quasistatic cyclic test: numerical simulation

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Figure 15

Ni–Ti quasistatic cyclic test: (a) first cycle comparison; (b) 20th cycle comparison

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Figure 16

Ni–Ti quasi-static cyclic test: (a) σAM comparison; (b) εir comparison

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Figure 17

Equivalent complex Young’s modulus: cycle and strain influence for the Ni–Ti

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Figure 18

Cu–Al–Be(1) temperature variation simulation: (a) test at 10−4s−1; (b) test at 10−2s−1

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Figure 19

Cu–Al–Be(1) temperature variation simulation: (a) test at 10−1s−1; (b) test at 2×10−1s−1

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