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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Elasto-viscoplastic constitutive equations for the description of glassy polymers behavior at constant strain rate

[+] Author and Article Information
Fahmi Zaïri1

Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille,  Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Polytech’Lille, Avenue P. Langevin, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex, Francefahmi.zairi@polytech-lille.fr

Moussa Naït-Abdelaziz

Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille,  Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Polytech’Lille, Avenue P. Langevin, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex, France

Krzysztof Woznica

Laboratoire Energétique Explosions Structures,  ENSI de Bourges, 10 Boulevard Lahitolle, 18020 Bourges Cedex, France

Jean-Michel Gloaguen

Laboratoire de Structure et Propriétés de l’Etat Solide,  Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 129(1), 29-35 (Jan 25, 2006) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2400256 History: Received April 14, 2004; Revised January 25, 2006

In this study, a modelization of the viscoplastic behavior of amorphous polymers is proposed, from an approach originally developed for metal behavior at high temperature, in which state variable constitutive equations have been modified. A procedure for the identification of model parameters is developed through the use of experimental data from both uniaxial compressive tests extracted from the literature and uniaxial tensile tests performed in this study across a variety of strain rates. The numerical algorithm shows that the predictions of this model well describe qualitatively and quantitatively the intrinsic softening immediately after yielding and the subsequent progressive orientational hardening corresponding to the response of two polymers, amorphous polyethylene terephthalate and rubber toughened polymethyl methacrylate.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Stress–strain curves at 10−3s−1 for the different material parameters listed in Table 1

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Figure 2

Work hardening rate versus stress

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Figure 3

Yield stress versus strain rate for an amorphous PET, tested in compression and at room temperature

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Figure 4

Compressive stress–strain curves for an amorphous PET, at room temperature (( *) experimental data from Ref. 7)

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Figure 5

Tensile specimen geometry of RT-PMMA

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Figure 6

Experimental stress–strain curves under different strain rates and at room temperature for a RT-PMMA

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Figure 7

Yield stress versus strain rate for a RT-PMMA, tested in tension and at room temperature

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Figure 8

Tensile stress–strain curves for a RT-PMMA, at room temperature

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Figure 9

Deformation mechanisms in a RT-PMMA at 10−3s−1 and at room temperature

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