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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Characterization of the Core Properties of a Shock Absorbing Composite

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Georgiades, J. R. Wright, J. T. Turner

School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK

S. O. Oyadiji1

School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UKs.o.oyadiji@manchester.ac.uk

X. Q. Zhu2

School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK

1

Corresponding author.

2

Currently at School of Civil and Resource Engineering, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 129(4), 497-504 (Jul 15, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2772323 History: Received July 10, 2005; Revised July 15, 2006

This paper is on the characterization of the mechanical properties of Newtonian-type shock absorbing elastomeric composites. This composite material is a blend of elastomeric capsules or beads in a matrix of a Newtonian liquid. The material can be considered as a liquid analogy to elastomeric foams. It exhibits bulk compression characteristics and acts like an elastic liquid during an impact, unlike elastic foams, which exhibit uniaxial compression characteristics. A test cell consisting of an instrumented metal cylinder and a piston was designed. A sample of the material was placed in the instrumented cylinder, which was located at the base of a drop test rig. A drop mass of 17.3kg was subsequently released from a desired height to impact the piston. From measurements of the acceleration histories of the drop mass and the piston, and from the displacement history of the piston, the force-displacement curves and the associated impact energies absorbed were derived. These are compared to the corresponding characteristics derived from measurements of pressure of the fluid medium inside the cylinder. The results are compared for blends of different bead types, and the different aspects contributing to their performance are discussed. It is shown that the performance curves derived from the accelerometer measurements matched those derived from the pressure measurements. Blends of this composite material of different types of beads showed distinctively different characteristics.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Additional catapult system used on drop test rig

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Figure 3

Instrumented test cell and drop mass

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Figure 4

Model for estimation of impact force

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Figure 5

Stress-strain characteristics of the shock absorbing liquid composite samples comprising small, large, and small+largeSCONAPOR™ beads in a low-viscosity fluid (Dow Corning Silicone Oil of 1cS)

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Figure 6

Stress-strain characteristics of the shock absorbing liquid composite samples comprising small, large, and small+large SCONAPOR beads in a medium-viscosity fluid (Dow Corning Silicone Oil of 1000cS)

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Figure 7

Stress-strain characteristics of the shock absorbing liquid composite samples comprising small, large, and small+large SCONAPOR beads in a high-viscosity fluid (Dow Corning Silicone Oil of 12,500cS)

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Figure 8

Stress-strain characteristics of the shock absorbing liquid composite samples comprising small SCONAPOR beads in low-, medium-, and high-viscosity fluids (Dow Corning Silicone Oil of 1cS, 1000cS, and 12,500cS) derived from the accelerometer readings

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Figure 9

Stress-strain characteristics of SALi samples comprising small+large SCONAPOR beads in low-, medium-, and high-viscosity fluids (Dow Corning Silicone Oil of 1cS, 1000cS, and 12,500cS) derived from the accelerometer readings

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Figure 10

Stress-strain characteristics of the shock absorbing liquid composite samples comprising large SCONAPOR beads in low-, medium-, and high-viscosity fluids (Dow Corning Silicone Oil of 1cS, 1000cS, and 12,500cS) derived from the accelerometer readings

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Figure 11

Stress-strain characteristics of the shock absorbing liquid composite samples comprising small SCONAPOR beads in low-, medium-, and high-viscosity fluids (Dow Corning Silicone Oil of 1cS, 1000cS, and 12,500cS) derived from the pressure readings

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Figure 12

Effect of strain rate on the stress-strain characteristics of the shock absorbing liquid composite samples comprising small SCONAPOR beads in low-viscosity fluids (Dow Corning Silicone Oil of 1cS) derived from the pressure readings

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Figure 13

Stress-strain characteristics of the shock absorbing liquid composite samples comprising small+large SCONAPOR beads in low-, medium-, and high-viscosity fluids (Dow Corning Silicone Oil of 1cS, 1000cS, and 12,500cS) derived from the pressure readings

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