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Research Papers

Mechanical Properties of Crimped Mineral Wools: Identification From Digital Image Correlation

[+] Author and Article Information
Jean-François Witz

LMT-Cachan, ENS de Cachan, CNRS-UMR 8535,  Université Paris 6, 61 Avenue du Président Wilson, F-94235 Cachan Cedex, Francewitz@lmt.ens-cachan.fr

Stéphane Roux

LMT-Cachan, ENS de Cachan, CNRS-UMR 8535,  Université Paris 6, 61 Avenue du Président Wilson, F-94235 Cachan Cedex, Francestephane.roux@lmt.ens-cachan.fr

François Hild

LMT-Cachan, ENS de Cachan, CNRS-UMR 8535,  Université Paris 6, 61 Avenue du Président Wilson, F-94235 Cachan Cedex, Francefrancois.hild@lmt.ens-cachan.fr

Jean-Baptiste Rieunier

 CRIR, Isover-Saint-Gobain, 19 rue Emile Zola, F-60290 Rantigny, Francejean-baptiste.rieunier@saint-gobain.com

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 130(2), 021016 (Mar 13, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2884575 History: Received July 15, 2007; Accepted November 06, 2007; Published March 13, 2008

Crimped mineral wools are characterized by a strongly anisotropic microstructure, whose local preferential orientation is highly heterogeneous. It is proposed to identify the local anisotropic elastic behavior through a combination of different tools based on image analysis. First, the local orientation map is determined from a reference image. Second, a series of images captured at different loading stages is analyzed with a digital image correlation code to estimate the displacement field. Last, an inverse analysis is applied to evaluate the four elastic moduli of the local elastic properties. This procedure is tested against a set of experimental data on mineral wool with different crimping structures.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Different steps of the image-based identification procedure

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Figure 2

Schematic view of the crimping process (top) and examples of crimped textures with characteristic features such as “V-shaped” crimping (left), fine-scale vertical texture (center), and coarse isotropic texture (right)

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Figure 3

Anisotropy field of Specimen 90 superimposed on the original image

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Figure 4

Comparison between measured and identified displacement fields in pixels for Specimen 90. The measured displacement field is shown on the left (vertical (top) and horizontal (bottom) components). The identified displacement fields are shown in the middle column, and the error fields are displayed on the right.

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Figure 5

Comparison between measured (left) and computed (right) displacement fields in pixel relative to Specimen 91 (vertical (top) and horizontal (bottom) displacement components)

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Figure 6

Comparison between measured (left) and computed (right) displacement fields in pixel relative to Specimen 94 (vertical (top) and horizontal (bottom) displacement components)

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Figure 7

Comparison between measured (left) and computed (right) displacement fields in pixel relative to Specimen 95 (vertical (top) and horizontal (bottom) displacement components)

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Figure 8

Experimental stress-strain compression data for Specimen 90 (top, left), Specimen 91 (top, right), Specimen 94 (bottom, left), and Specimen 95 (bottom, right). The computed elastic stiffness is shown as a dashed line in each plot.

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Figure 9

Top: measured horizontal field; middle left: computed horizontal displacement field using globally homogeneous elastic moduli; middle right: associated error field; bottom left: computed horizontal displacement field using locally homogeneous parameters; bottom right: associated error map

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