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Research Papers

Detection and Monitoring of Corrosion in Structural Carbon Steels Using Electromagnetic Sensors

[+] Author and Article Information
F. Rumiche

Department of Civil and Materials Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 842 West Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60607frumic1@uic.edu

J. E. Indacochea

Department of Civil and Materials Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 842 West Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60607jeindaco@uic.edu

M. L. Wang

Department of Civil and Materials Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 842 West Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60607mlwang@uic.edu

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 130(3), 031008 (Jun 10, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2931145 History: Received January 22, 2007; Revised March 25, 2008; Published June 10, 2008

An electromagnetic sensor was assessed as a possible instrument for nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion in structural carbon steels. In this study, the magnetic response of three structural carbon steel rods (AISI 1018, AISI 1045, and AISI 1045-High Mn), was evaluated in the as-received (uncorroded) and corroded conditions. Initially, the material was systematically machined out from each steel rod, followed by the magnetic evaluation of each specimen. Other set of metal rods were exposed to uniform corrosion and later examined by the electromagnetic sensor. Correlations have been established between the degree of mass loss and magnetic response of the test specimen. Based on the results, it can be said that the electromagnetic sensor has the potential to be used as a reliable nondestructive tool to detect corrosion at early stages based on the variation in magnetic properties. A metallurgical analysis of all test rods was also undertaken, which showed that microstructures have an important effect of the magnetic properties of the steels.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Microstructures of steels: (a) AISI 1018, (b) AISI 1045, and (c) AISI 1045-High Mn

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Figure 2

Appearance of AISI 1045 steel rods that were (a) machined and (b) uniformly corroded. The affected area was 50.8mm long in the middle of the rods.

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Figure 3

Schematics of the electromagnetic sensor and measuring system

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Figure 4

Apparent hysteresis curves for the AISI 1045 steel at different levels of reduction in cross section area

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Figure 5

Apparent magnetic saturation versus normalized mass loss for the machined samples of the three steel rods considered in this investigation

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Figure 6

Apparent retentivity versus normalized mass loss for the three machined steel rod samples

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Figure 7

Apparent magnetic saturation versus normalized mass loss for the corroded samples. The shorter continuous lines represent the measurements on the corroded specimens with the corrosion scale attached; the dashed line is for the samples without corrosion scale. The three long continuous lines correspond to the machined samples.

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Figure 8

Surface morphologies of the corroded (50min) and machined specimens corresponding to the AISI 1045-High Mn steel rod

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Figure 9

XRD spectrum for the corrosion scale produced by the galvanic corrosion of the steel rods used in this investigation. All the spectra yielded the same results.

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