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Research Papers

Improvement of Formability and Spring-Back of AA5052-H32 Sheets Based on Surface Friction Stir Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Sangjoon Park, Heung Nam Han

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 56-1 Shinlim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742, Korea

Chang Gil Lee, Sung-Joon Kim

Department of Advanced Metallic Materials, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 66 Sangnam-dong, Changwon, Kyeongnam 641-010, Korea

Junehyung Kim

Mobile Communication Division, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., 416 Maetan-3dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-742, Korea

Kwansoo Chung1

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 56-1 Shinlim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742, Koreakchung@snu.ac.kr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 130(4), 041007 (Sep 09, 2008) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2975233 History: Received March 01, 2008; Revised June 07, 2008; Published September 09, 2008

A process to improve formability and spring-back was developed for AA5xxx-H temper sheets based on the surface friction stir (SFS) method. In the SFS method, a rotating probe stirs the sheet surface so that material flow and heat, which result from plastic deformation and friction, change the microstructure and macroscopic mechanical properties of the stirred zone and therefore, ultimately, the formability and spring-back performances of the whole sheet. When applied to AA5052-H32 sheets, the process improved formability and spring-back, as experimentally and numerically confirmed in the limit dome height and unconstrained bending tests.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Friction , Probes , Springs
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Figures

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Figure 1

The schematic view of the surface friction stir (SFS) process

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Figure 2

Forming limit diagrams calculated based on Hill’s bifurcation and MK theories: (a) the AA5052-H32 base sheet, (b) the surface friction stirred zone (probe size: 5 mm), and (c) the surface friction stirred zone (probe size: 10 mm)

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Figure 3

Cross-sections and plastic zone depths of the surface friction stirred sheets: (a) probe size: 5 mm (plastic zone depth: 0.65 mm) and (b) probe size: 10 mm (plastic zone depth: 0.94 mm)

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Figure 4

Uniaxial tensile test specimens: (a) dimensions of the subsized specimen and (b) arrangement of subsized specimens

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Figure 5

The hardening curves of the AA5052-H32 base sheet and the surface friction stirred zones

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Figure 6

The hardening curves of the stirred and the near stirred zones: (a) probe size: 5 mm, (b) probe size: 8 mm, and (c) probe size: 10 mm

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Figure 7

Grain size refinements at the surface friction stirred zone observed using EBSD

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Figure 8

Transmission electron micrographs: (a) the base material before the uniaxial tensile and LDH tests, (b) the base material after the uniaxial tensile test, (c) the base material after the LDH test, (d) the stirred zone of the 10 mm probe before the uniaxial tensile and LDH tests, (e) the stirred zone of the 10 mm probe after the uniaxial tensile test, and (f) the stirred zone of the 10 mm probe after the LDH test

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Figure 9

Two types of rectangular specimens for LDH tests: (a) longitudinal type and (b) transverse type

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Figure 10

Punch heights at failure for the LDH test: (a) the longitudinal type and (b) the transverse type

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Figure 11

Failure locations for the LDH test in the longitudinal type: (a) the base sheet, (b) the stirred sheet with the 5 mm probe, and (c) the stirred sheet with the 10 mm probe

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Figure 12

Failure locations for the LDH test in the transverse type: (a) the base sheet, (b) the stirred sheet with the 5 mm probe, and (c) the stirred sheet with the 10 mm probe

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Figure 13

The unconstrained bending test results: (a) the longitudinal type and (b) the transverse type

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Figure 14

Comparison of experimental and simulated spring-back angles in the unconstrained bending test: (a) the longitudinal type and (b) the transverse type

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