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Research Papers

Minimization of Friction Influence on the Evaluation of Rheological Parameters From Compression Test: Application to a Forging Steel Behavior Identification

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Diot, A. Gavrus, E. Ragneau

Laboratoire de Génie Civil et Génie Mécanique (LGCGM), EA 3913, National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA), 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, CS 14315, 35043 Rennes Cédex, France

D. Guines

Laboratoire de Génie Civil et Génie Mécanique (LGCGM), EA 3913, National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA), 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, CS 14315, 35043 Rennes Cédex, Francedominique.guines@insa-rennes.fr

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 131(1), 011001 (Dec 15, 2008) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3026543 History: Received January 17, 2007; Revised August 18, 2008; Published December 15, 2008

In order to characterize the metal behavior at strain, strain rate, and temperature range encountered in metal forming processes, the rheological compressive test is well adapted and has been often used. Nevertheless, this experimental test is more complicated to realize than the extension one and requires some particular considerations owing to the friction condition occurring between the specimen and the dies. This paper deals with a new specimen shape proposed to realize both static and dynamic compression tests. The independence of the material parameters to die friction is highlighted by means of a pseudo-experimental validation. The proposed specimen shape is validated by compression tests carried out on a 50CD4 steel (norm EN 10 083). The choice of the mathematical form of the constitutive law allowing to characterize its behavior at strains, strain rates, and temperatures corresponding to an extrusion application is then discussed. To replicate more accurately the nonuniformity of the different fields in the specimen, a classical inverse procedure consisting in coupling a finite element model of the compression test with an optimization module is used to determined the rheological parameters.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Dimensions (in millimeter) of the compression specimen

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Figure 3

Experimental compression device: (a) 3D view without specimen, and (b) view cut with specimen

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Figure 4

Compression specimen mesh

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Figure 5

Strain in the specimen during the compression test

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Figure 6

Influence of friction coefficient on the compression force

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Figure 7

Numerical validation of the independence of the material characterization from die friction

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Figure 8

Pseudo-experimental base and simulated curves from identified parameters

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Figure 9

Experimental load versus displacement curves for compression tests performed at speed V and temperature T on 50CrMo4 (EN 10 083) steel

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Figure 10

Stress versus strain curves for compression tests performed at speed V and temperature T on 50CrMo4 (EN 10 083) steel

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Figure 11

Initial strain rate influence on the maximal estimated stress

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Figure 12

Influence of strain

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Figure 13

Evolution of ln(σ¯estmax) with (a) the temperature T and (b) the inverse of temperature 1∕T

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Figure 14

Influence of the initial temperature on maximal estimated stress

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Figure 15

Comparison between experimental and simulated forces versus displacement curves

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Figure 1

Inverse analysis: rheological parameter characterization by iterative procedure

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