0
Research Papers

Characterization of the Residual Stresses and Strength of Ceramic-Metal Braze Joints

[+] Author and Article Information
Matteo Galli

Laboratoire de mécanique appliquée et d’analyse de fiabilité, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland

John Botsis1

Laboratoire de mécanique appliquée et d’analyse de fiabilité, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne, Switzerlandjohn.botsis@epfl.ch

Jolanta Janczak-Rusch

Laboratory for Surface and Joining Technology, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland

Gerd Maier, Udo Welzel

 Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 131(2), 021004 (Mar 06, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3078305 History: Received February 13, 2008; Revised November 26, 2008; Published March 06, 2009

Residual stress relief in ceramic-metal joints produced by active brazing depends primarily on the plastic response of the filler metal. A procedure for the production and mechanical characterization of bulk active filler alloy specimens is developed. In parallel ceramic-metal joints are produced and tested. Residual stresses are measured by X-ray diffraction while the joint strength is assessed by four-point bend tests. The obtained elastoplastic properties of the filler are introduced into finite element models to predict the residual stresses in the joints and their behavior in bending. The results of the simulations show good agreement both with the residual stress measurements and with the results of four-point bend tests.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

The brazing jig with four brazed joints

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Schematic of half specimen with the positions chosen for XRD measurements (units in microns)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Temperature dependent stress-strain curves of Incusil™ABA®

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Average experimental uniaxial tensile stress-strain curve for Incusil™ABA® (see text for details)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Microstructure of Incusil™ABA® in the dogbone specimen (see text for details)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Microstructure of Incusil™ABA® in the ceramic-metal joint (see text for details)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Comparison between XRD measurements at points 1–3 (along the specimen axis) and numerical results for the two specimens

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Comparison between XRD measurements at points 4–6 (200 μm from the specimen axis) and numerical results for the two specimens

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Maximum principal stress distribution after cooling (the ceramic component is on the left): Stresses are higher along the ceramic edges at a small distance from the interface with the braze (units in megapascals)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Maximum principal stress distribution in the joint under an applied moment of about 2 N m (the ceramic component is on the left): Stresses are higher along the ceramic edges at a small distance from the interface with the braze (units in megapascals)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Longitudinal stress distribution in the Incusil™ABA® joint under an applied moment of about 2 N m (the ceramic component is on the left): Far from the interface stresses evolve linearly along the joint thickness as predicted by beam theory (units in megapascals)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Comparison between numerical and experimental results for four-point bend test; the maximum principal stress in the ceramic component obtained by FE (solid line) is compared with the experimental point having as abscissa the average nominal bend strength of the joints and as ordinate the average nominal bend strength of the bulk ceramic material

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

A braze filler dogbone specimen instrumented with a strain gauge (a) and its dimensions (b); units in millimeters

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In