0
Research Papers

Nanoclay and Microballoons Wall Thickness Effect on Dynamic Properties of Syntactic Foam

[+] Author and Article Information
Sameer L. Peter

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

Eyassu Woldesenbet1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803woldesen@me.lsu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 131(2), 021007 (Mar 09, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3078302 History: Received June 12, 2008; Revised December 29, 2008; Published March 09, 2009

The effect of nanoclay on the high strain rate mechanical properties of syntactic foams is studied. Two types of microballoons with different wall thicknesses are used in fabrication of plain and nanoclay syntactic foams. Plain syntactic foams are fabricated with 60% volume fraction of glass microballoons. 1%, 2%, and 5% volume fractions of Nanomer I.30E nanoclay are incorporated to produce nanoclay syntactic foams. High strain rate test using split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus is performed on all types of plain and nanoclay syntactic foams. Dynamic modulus, strength, and corresponding strain are calculated using the SHPB data. Quasistatic test is also performed and results are compared with the dynamic SHPB results. The results demonstrate the importance of nanoclay and microballoon wall thickness in determination of syntactic foam dynamic properties. It is found that at a high strain rate, the strength and modulus of composite foams having K46 microballoons increase due to addition of 1% volume fraction of nanoclay. However, in composite foams having S22 microballoons, the increase in strength is not significant at a high strain rate. Further increase in nanoclay volume fraction to 2% and 5% reduces the strength and modulus of composite foams having S22 microballoons. Difference in wall thickness of microballoons is found to affect the strength, modulus, strain energy, and deformation of composite foams. Composite foams fabricated with thicker walled microballoons (K46) show comparatively higher values of strength, modulus, and strain energy compared with thin walled (S22) microballoons. Scanning electron microscopy shows that crack propagation behavior is distinct at different strain rates.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic representation of microballoon

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Crystal lattice structure of montmorillonite

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Schematic arrangement of nanoclay platelets

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Block diagram of Hopkinson bar apparatus

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Edgewise quasistatic compression of syntactic foam

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Strength and modulus versus nanoclay volume fraction for S22 composite foams

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Strength and modulus versus nanoclay volume fraction for K46 composites foams

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

SEM image showing crack propagation in NSF2260–1 in quasistatic test

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

SEM image showing crack propagation in NSF2260–1 in high strain rate test

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

TEM image showing nanoclay agglomeration

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

SEM image showing voids in NSF2260–5

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

SEM image showing crack propagation in NSF4660–1 at high strain rate

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Effect of microballoon wall thickness on dynamic properties

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In