0
Research Papers

Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of a Split-Sleeve Cold Expansion Process

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Ismonov

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39762si19@msstate.edu

S. R. Daniewicz

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39762daniewicz@me.msstate.edu

J. C. Newman

Department of Aerospace Engineering, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39762j.c.newman.jr@ae.msstate.edu

M. R. Hill

Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616mrhill@ucdavis.edu

M. R. Urban

Structural Methods and Prognostics, Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., Stratford, CT 06497murban@sikorsky.com

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 131(3), 031007 (May 26, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3120392 History: Received September 19, 2008; Revised February 20, 2009; Published May 26, 2009

A cold expansion process is used to prolong the fatigue life of a structure under cyclic loadings. The process produces a beneficial compressive residual stress zone in the hole vicinity, which retards the initiation and propagation of the crack at the hole edge. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the split-sleeve cold expansion process was developed to predict the resulting residual stress field. A thin rectangular aluminum sheet with a centrally located hole was considered. A rigid mandrel and an elastic steel split sleeve were explicitly modeled with the appropriate contact elements at the interfaces between the mandrel, the sleeve, and the hole. Geometrical and material nonlinearities were included. The simulation results were compared with experimental measurements of the residual stress. The influence of friction and the prescribed boundary conditions for the sheet were studied. Differences between the split-sleeve- and the non-split-sleeve model solutions are discussed.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Split-sleeve cold expansion process description

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Geometries of the (a) specimen, (b) split sleeve, and (c) mandrel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Elastoplastic stress-strain curve of aluminum AA7075-T6 sheet

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Finite element mesh of the cold expansion model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Geometry of the smoothed sleeve split edge

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Prescribed boundary conditions used in finite element model (case (a) is depicted here)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Photograph of the cold expanded hole coupon showing nominal dimensions and residual stress measurement plane

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Normalized circumferential residual stress results from isotropic and kinematic hardening material models compared with experimental measurements: (a) entrance face, (b) z/tp=0.25, (c) mid-thickness, (d) z/tp=0.75, (e) exit face, and (f) through thickness direction at x/r=1 and y=0

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Normalized circumferential residual stress results for different friction coefficients: (a) entrance face, (b) mid-thickness, (c) exit face, and (d) through thickness direction at x/r=1 and y=0

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Circumferential residual stress curves from split-sleeve and non-split-sleeve models (a) on the plane y=0 and (b) at the hole surface with μ=0.2 and case (a) BC

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Circumferential residual stress contours (in MPa) around the hole edge of the sheet for the split-sleeve (left) and the non-split-sleeve (right) models, μ=0.2, case (a) BC

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Normalized circumferential residual stress results for case (a) and BC with μ=0.2: (a) entrance face, (b) mid-thickness, (c) exit face, and (d) through thickness direction at x/r=1 and y=0

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In