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PREDICTIVE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN MECHANICS AND MATERIALS

Influence of Manufacturing Processes and Microstructures on the Performance and Manufacturability of Advanced High Strength Steels

[+] Author and Article Information
K. S. Choi, W. N. Liu, M. A. Khaleel

 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352

X. Sun1

 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352xin.sun@pnl.gov

J. R. Fekete

 General Motors Corporation, 30001 Van Dyke Avenue, Warren, MI 48090

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 131(4), 041205 (Aug 27, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3183778 History: Received February 06, 2009; Revised April 21, 2009; Published August 27, 2009

Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are performance-based steel grades and their global material properties can be achieved with various steel chemistries and manufacturing processes, leading to various microstructures. In this paper, we investigate the influence of the manufacturing process and the resulting microstructure difference on the overall mechanical properties, as well as the local formability behaviors of AHSS. For this purpose, we first examined the basic material properties and the transformation kinetics of three different commercial transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) 800 steels under different testing temperatures. The experimental results show that the mechanical and microstructural properties of the TRIP 800 steels significantly depend on the thermomechanical processing parameters employed in making these steels. Next, we examined the local formability of two commercial dual phase (DP) 980 steels which exhibit noticeably different formability during the stamping process. Microstructure-based finite element analyses are carried out to simulate the localized deformation process with the two DP 980 microstructures, and the results suggest that the possible reason for the difference in formability lies in the morphology of the hard martensite phase in the DP microstructure. The results of this study suggest that a set of updated material acceptance and screening criteria is needed to better quantify and ensure the manufacturability of AHSS.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Typical thermomechanical processing procedures for TRIP steels

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Figure 2

Roles of alloying elements for TRIP steels (18)

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Figure 3

Comparison of engineering stress-strain curves of the three TRIP 800 steels under (a) room temperature, (b) 93°C, and (c) −40°C

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Figure 4

Comparison of work hardening rates of the three TRIP 800 steels under (a) room temperature, (b) 93°C, and (c) −40°C

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Figure 5

(a) Orientation map and (b) phase map for undeformed Material A

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Figure 6

Engineering stress-strain curves and transformation kinetics under different deformation temperatures: (a) Material A, (b) Material B, and (c) Material C

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Figure 7

Engineering stress-strain curves of the two DP 980 steels

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Figure 8

Shear fracture during stamping process of the two DP 980 steels

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Figure 9

Actual microstructures of the two DP 980 steels: (a) Material D and (b) Material E

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Figure 10

Finite element model used for the RVE of DP 980 shown in Fig. 9

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Figure 11

Input stress-strain curves for the ferrite and martensite phases, and the comparison of macroscopic responses of the RVE and experimental curve

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Figure 12

Failure mode of the RVE under uniaxial tension based on plane stress elements (CPS3)

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Figure 13

Distribution of equivalent plastic strain in the RVE under uniaxial tension based on plane strain elements (CPE3): (a) e=28% and (b) e=32%

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Figure 14

Distribution of equivalent plastic strain in single phase homogeneous material under tension and indentation

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Figure 15

Effects of indent size and position on distribution of equivalent plastic strain in the RVE of DP 980 under tension and indentation

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Figure 16

Distribution of equivalent plastic strain in the RVE of DP 980 (shown in Fig. 9) under tension and indentation

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