0
Research Papers

Characterization of Integrated Functionally Gradient Syntactic Foams

[+] Author and Article Information
Kanakaji Chittineni

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

Eyassu Woldesenbet1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803woldesen@me.lsu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 132(1), 011005 (Nov 03, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3184032 History: Received September 25, 2008; Revised May 14, 2009; Published November 03, 2009; Online November 03, 2009

Light weight high strength composites can be obtained by reinforcing resin with fillers such as hollow or solid particles and fibers. Composites were fabricated using microballoons (hollow particles) called syntactic foams. These foams can be used in various low density applications such as buoyancy aid materials for deep sea exploration and aerospace vehicles. These foams are usually utilized as light weight core materials for sandwich structures. The present study explores the procedure to fabricate functionally gradient syntactic foams (FGSFs) and further analyze their mechanical properties. The FGSFs produced are gradient structures consisting of four layers with four different types of microballoons, namely, S22, S32, S38, and K46, each having different wall thickness. The volume fraction of all microballoons is maintained constant at 60% to maintain light weight structures. Several FGSF specimens having similar density are fabricated with different layer arrangements. The different layers are integrated before major solidification takes place. Quasistatic compression testing is then performed on the cured FGSF samples using MTS-810 servohydraulic machine. Compressive strength and energy absorption values for each arrangement are compared. The stress plateau in integrated FGSF composites extends from 10% to 60% strain compared with plain syntactic foams. The integrated FGSF shows increment in yield strength and energy absorption compared with adhesively bonded FGSF. It is found that the compressive strength and energy absorption of integrated FGSF composites can be varied based on arrangement of the layers.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic representation of microballoon

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Stress-strain curves for plain syntactic foams having different densities

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Schematic representation FGSF with four types of microballoons

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Pictorial representation of different FGSF configurations used in this study

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Schematic representation of mold assembly

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Stress versus strain curves of K46-S22-S22-K46 FGSF

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Stress versus strain curves of S22-K46-K46-S22 FGSF

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Stress versus strain curves of S32-S38-S38-S32 FGSF

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Stress versus strain curves of S38-S32-S32-S38 FGSF

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Stress versus strain curves of K46-S38-S32-S22 FGSF

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Stress versus strain plots for various configurations tested

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Comparative stress-strain plateau of K46-S38-S32-S22 between adhesively bonded FGSF and layer over layer integrated FGSF

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Initiation of crack in S22 layer (K46-S38-S32-S22 configuration)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Propagation of crack in K46-S38-S32-S22 configuration

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Propagation of crack from S32 to S38 layer in S32-S38-S38-S32 configuration

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Densification and crack propagation in S38-S32-S32-S38 configuration

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Propagation of crack from S22 to K46 layer in S22-K46-K46-S22 configuration

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Densification and crack propagation in K46-S22-S22-K46 configuration

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In