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Research Papers

Fatigue Behavior of Stainless Steel 304L Including Strain Hardening, Prestraining, and Mean Stress Effects

[+] Author and Article Information
Julie Colin

Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606

Ali Fatemi1

Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606afatemi@eng.utoledo.edu

Said Taheri

LaMSID, Common Research Laboratory CNRS-EDF, 2832 Electricité de France, Departement AMA, 1 Avenue du Général de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart Cedex, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 132(2), 021008 (Feb 18, 2010) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000224 History: Received March 12, 2009; Revised July 29, 2009; Published February 18, 2010; Online February 18, 2010

This paper discusses cyclic deformation and fatigue behaviors of stainless steel 304L and aluminum 7075-T6. Effects of loading sequence, mean strain or stress, and prestraining were investigated. The behavior of aluminum is shown not to be affected by preloading, whereas the behavior of stainless steel is greatly influenced by prior loading. Mean stress relaxation in strain control and ratcheting in load control and their influence on fatigue life are discussed. Some unusual mean strain test results are presented for SS304L, where in spite of mean stress relaxation fatigue lives were significantly longer than fully-reversed tests. Prestraining indicated no effect on either deformation or fatigue behavior of aluminum, while it induced considerable hardening in SS304L and led to different results on fatigue life, depending on the test control mode. Possible mechanisms for secondary hardening observed in some tests, characterized by a continuous increase in the stress response and leading to runout fatigue life, are also discussed. The Smith–Watson–Topper parameter was shown to correlate most of the experimental data for both materials under different loading conditions.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Microstructure for stainless steel 304L

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Figure 2

Specimen geometry for stainless 304L (dimensions in millimeters)

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Figure 3

Stress responses from strain-controlled fatigue tests (a), and strain responses from load-controlled fatigue tests (b) versus number of cycles for stainless steel 304L

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Figure 4

Superimposed midlife hysteresis loops from constant amplitude fatigue tests for stainless steel 304L (a) and aluminum 7075-T6 (b)

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Figure 5

Superimposed monotonic (experimental) and cyclic curve (fit) and cyclic data, for stainless steel 304L (a) and aluminum 7075-T6 (b)

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Figure 6

Strain history (a) and stress response (b) versus the number of cycles in incremental step test for stainless steel 304L

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Figure 7

Stress amplitude versus strain amplitude for incremental step tests including prestrained data for stainless steel 304L (a), and aluminum 7075-T6 (b)

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Figure 8

Elastic, plastic and total strain versus reversals to failure from fully-reversed constant amplitude strain-controlled (εC) and load-controlled tests, for stainless steel 304L (a), and aluminum 7075-T6 (b)

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Figure 9

Strain and load histories for different R ratio tests of SS304L

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Figure 10

Mean stress for strain-controlled tests (a) and mean strain for load-controlled tests at 215 MPa stress amplitude (b) versus number of cycles, at different R ratios for stainless steel 304L

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Figure 11

Strain-life (a) and stress-life (b) behaviors of stainless steel 304L, including all tests data

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Figure 12

Strain-life (a) and stress-life (b) behaviors for aluminum 7076-T6, including all tests data

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Figure 13

(a) Strain history of the prestrained tests for stainless steel 304L and (b) stress-strain paths of the cycles subsequent to prestraining for aluminum 7075-T6 (A and B have mean strain, C and D have mean stress)

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Figure 14

Stress response for all tests presenting secondary hardening.

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Figure 15

SWT versus reversals to failure, including all tests data for stainless steel 304 (a) and aluminum 7075-T6 (b)

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Figure 16

Observed versus predicted fatigue lives for stainless steel 304L and aluminum 7075-T6 databased on the SWT parameter

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