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Research Papers

Effect of Weld Location, Orientation, and Strain Path on Forming Behavior of AHSS Tailor Welded Blanks

[+] Author and Article Information
S. K. Panda1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302, Indiasushanta.panda@mech.iitkgp.ernet.in

J. Li, Y. Zhou

Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L3G1, Canada

V. H. Baltazar Hernandez

Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L3G1, Canada; MPyM-EPMM Academic Unit of Engineering, Autonomous University of Zacatecas, Zacatecas 98000, Mexico

F. Goodwin

 International Zinc Association, Durham, NC 27713

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 132(4), 041003 (Sep 08, 2010) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001965 History: Received January 08, 2010; Revised May 21, 2010; Published September 08, 2010; Online September 08, 2010

Use of multiple advanced high strength steel sheets for fabrication of tailor welded blanks (TWBs) is one of the current interests for automotive and steel industries as it reduces manufacturing cost and weight of the vehicle, and also improves the quality of the component. As the varieties of TWB applications are increasing, the effects of the difference in material properties, weld, and its orientation on blank formability have become important both in deep drawing and stretch forming. In this work, high strength low alloy (HSLA) grade steels were laser welded with two different dual phase steels having 980 MPa (DP980) and 600 MPa (DP600) tensile strengths to fabricate two different material combination TWBs (DP980-HSLA and DP600-HSLA). Formability of these two types of TWBs has been studied experimentally both in biaxial and plane strain stretch forming modes by performing limiting dome height (LDH) tests using a 101.6 mm diameter hemispherical punch. Five different weld locations during biaxial-stretch forming mode, and the effect of weld orientation with respect to major principal strain in plane strain stretch forming mode, have been studied. It was found that formability LDH and failure location depended on weld location, and LDH increased when weld line was positioned at the extreme positions away from the center due to more uniform strain distribution on the deformed dome. The welded blanks had lower formability in plane strain deformation mode compared with biaxial-stretch forming mode. However, influence of weld orientation on the formability depended on material combination. Changes in the fracture mode were confirmed from fractography analysis of biaxial, transverse plane strain, and longitudinal plane strain stretch formed samples.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Major and minor strains (strain path) while stamping various automotive parts

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Figure 2

Base metal microstructure corresponding to (a) HSLA, (b) DP600, and (c) DP980 steel

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Figure 3

Arrangement of tools in the experimental set-up for limiting dome height testing

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Figure 4

Laser welded blanks fabricated with different weld locations for biaxial-stretch forming tests: (a) −30 mm, (b) −15 mm, (c) center, (d) 15 mm, and (e) 30 mm

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Figure 5

Major and minor strain distribution on biaxial-stretch formed parent metals: (a) DP980, (b) DP600, and (c) HSLA

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Figure 6

Major and minor strain distributions on plane strain stretch formed parent metals: (a) DP980, (b) DP600, and (c) HSLA

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Figure 7

Laser welded blanks fabricated with different weld orientations for plane strain stretch forming tests: (a) longitudinal weld and (b) transverse weld

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Figure 8

Engineering stress-engineering strain curves of parent metals and transverse laser welded blanks

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Figure 9

Percentage elongation obtained from uniaxial tensile testing of transverse laser welded blanks for different weld locations

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Figure 10

Major strain distribution across the weld of transverse laser welded (DP980-HSLA) uniaxial tensile specimens for different weld locations

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Figure 11

Biaxial-stretch formed DP600-HSLA laser welded coupons with different weld locations from center: (a) −30 mm, (b) −15 mm, (c) center, (d) 15 mm, and (e) 30 mm

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Figure 12

Biaxial-stretch formed DP980-HSLA laser welded coupons with different weld locations from center: (a) −30 mm, (b) −15 mm, (c) center, (d) 15 mm, and (e) 30 mm.

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Figure 13

Plane strain stretch formed laser welded coupons with different weld orientations: (a) longitudinal DP600-HSLA, (b) transverse DP600-HSLA, (c) longitudinal DP980-HSLA, and (d) transverse DP980-HSLA

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Figure 14

Representative images of the biaxial stretch forming specimen showing (a) cross section macrostructure at the location of failure, (b) microstructure beside the failure, and (c) fractured surface

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Figure 15

Representative images of the transverse plane strain forming specimen showing (a) cross section macrostructure at the location of failure, (b) microstructure beside the failure, and (c) fractured surface

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Figure 16

Representative images of the longitudinal plane strain forming specimen showing (a) cross section macrostructure at the location of failure, (b) microstructure beside the failure, and (c) fractured surface

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Figure 17

Comparison of limiting dome height of laser welded blanks with different weld positions during biaxial-stretch forming

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Figure 18

Comparison of load progression curves obtained during biaxial-stretch forming of DP980-HSLA laser welded blanks with the parent metals

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Figure 19

Limiting dome height of laser welded blanks with different weld orientations during plane strain stretch forming

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Figure 20

Load progression curve for DP600-HSLA laser welded blanks obtained during plane strain stretch forming

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Figure 21

Major and minor strain distribution patterns for biaxial-stretch formed DP600-HSLA and DP980-HSLA laser welded blanks at three different weld locations

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Figure 22

Major and minor strain distribution patterns for plane strain stretch formed DP600-HSLA and DP980-HSLA laser welded blanks with longitudinal and transverse weld orientations

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