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Research Papers

Progressive Damage Analysis of Random Chopped Fiber Composite Using Finite Elements

[+] Author and Article Information
Yi Pan

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854yipan@eden.rutgers.edu

Assimina A. Pelegri1

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854pelegri@jove.rutgers.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 133(1), 011018 (Dec 09, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002652 History: Received June 08, 2010; Revised December 08, 2010; Published December 09, 2010; Online December 09, 2010

The mechanical properties of random chopped fiber composites are analyzed using micromechanical principles. A progressive damage model is adopted to investigate the damage and failure of the material. A representative volume element is generated numerically based on microscopic observations that capture the complex mesostructure of the random chopped fiber composite specimens. Sequentially, the mechanical properties are obtained using a micromechanics approach, particularly, the homogenization method. The underlying hypothesis insinuates that damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking, fiber damage, and interfacial debonding are responsible for the damaged behavior of the composite. Matrix cracking and fiber damage are modeled by progressive degradation of their respective stiffnesses. The interfacial debonding is modeled with a cohesive zone model. The prediction of uniaxial tensile response is compared with experimental data.

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Figures

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Figure 1

RVE of an random chopped E-glass fiber reinforced composite (Vf=22.5%)

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Figure 2

RVE of an random chopped E-glass fiber reinforced composite (Vf=38.1%)

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Figure 3

Effective stress-strain responses illustrate the effect of interfacial strength on the behavior of RaFC under uniaxial loading at different interfacial critical energy release rates: (a) G=50 J/m2, (b) G=200 J/m2, and (c) G=400 J/m2. It is shown that higher interfacial strength delays the onset of material degradation, as marked by the empty markers. The corresponding filled marker (same shape) denotes the first interfacial element failure in each case: ◻: τ=20 MPa; ◇: τ=50 MPa; △: τ=100 MPa.

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Figure 4

Effect of interfacial fracture toughness on overall stress-strain response under uniaxial loading for τ=50 MPa. Higher fracture toughness slows down material degradation process per applied strain. First element failure is marked by a filled marker in each case: ●: G=50 J/m2; ◆: G=200 J/m2, ▲: G=400 J/m2; ◻: damage onset.

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Figure 5

Comparison of stress-strain responses from simulation and from experiments. INTF/NOINTF means cohesive interface/rigid interface. RTS/NORTS means it is modeled with/without residual thermal stress. The upper-left inset shows that the first fiber breakage is responsible for the first peak in the stress-strain curve. The lower-right inset shows that the second fiber-bundle breakage is responsible for the second peak which is the highest one.

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Figure 6

Damage contour of the composite. SDV3 is the damage variable. It equals zero when a material point is intact and one if a material point is totally damaged.

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Figure 7

Failure image of the specimen. Failure of matrix, breakage of fiber, and bundle/matrix interfacial debonding are observed.

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