0
Research Papers

Finite Element Analysis of Welding Processes by Way of Hypoelasticity-Based Formulation

[+] Author and Article Information
You Sung Han1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Science Town, DaeJeon 305-701, South Koreayousung_han@kaist.ac.kr

Kyehyung Lee1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Science Town, DaeJeon 305-701, South Koreamech9676@kaist.ac.kr

Myoung-Soo Han

Industrial Application R&D Institute, Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Eng. Co. Ltd., 1 Ajoo-dong, Geoje-si, Gyoungnam 656-220, South Koreamshan@dsme.co.kr

Hyunchil Chang

Department of Machinery Design Research, Hyundai Maritime Research Institute, 1 Jeonha-dong, Dong-gu, Ulsan 682-792, South Korealucky7@hhi.co.kr

Kanghyouk Choi

 Department of CEM R&E Project, 700 Gumho-dong, Gwangyang-si, Jeonnam 545-711, South Koreakhchoi76@posco.com

Seyoung Im2

Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Science Town, DaeJeon 305-701, South Koreasim@kaist.ac.kr

1

These authors contributed equally to this work.

2

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 133(2), 021003 (Mar 03, 2011) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003099 History: Received September 16, 2009; Revised September 23, 2010; Published March 03, 2011; Online March 03, 2011

Welding is one of the most important joining processes, and the effect of welding residual stresses in a structure has a great deal of influence on its quality. In spite of such a key interest, the analysis of a welding process has not been successful as in a structural analysis. This is partially because welding involves complex phenomena that are manifested by the phase evolution and by thermomechanical processes as well. In the present study, a hypoelasticity-based formulation is applied to welding processes to determine residual deformation and stresses. Algorithmic consistent moduli for elastoplastic deformations including transformation plasticity are also obtained. Leblond’s phase evolution equation, coupled with the energy equation, is employed to calculate the phase volume fraction; this plays an important role as a constitutive parameter reflecting phase fraction effects in a mechanical constitutive equation. Furthermore, transformation plasticity is taken into account for an accurate evaluation of stress. The influence of the phase transformation and the transformation plasticity on residual stress is investigated by means of numerical analyses using metallurgical parameters in Leblond’s phase evolution equation that are adjusted with respect to various cooling rates in a CCT-diagram. Coding implementation is conducted by way of the ABAQUS user subroutines, DFLUX , UEXPAN , and UMAT . The numerical examples demonstrated that the phase transformation and the transformation plasticity have a significant effect on the residual stress of a welded structure.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Double ellipsoidal heat source configuration (5)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

CCT-diagram for EH36 steel

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

(a) The model of the deflection test. (b) The thermal history of the deflection test.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

The phase evolution of the given temperature history: (a) pearlite-ferrite, (b) bainite, (c) martensite, and (d) austenite

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

The stresses in the element A: (a) stress S11, (b) stress S12, (c) stress S13, (d) stress S22, (e) stress S23, and (f) stress S33

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

The finite element meshes of the butt welding process and element A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

(a) The temperature history in element A. (b) The phase evolution history in element A.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

The history of stresses with considering the phase transformation and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) or not. (a) The von Mises stress in element A. (b) The major stress component S22 in element A.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

The history of stresses at the final state, considering the phase transformation and transformation induced plasticity or not. (a) The region that is considered (perpendicular to the welding line). (b) The von Mises stress. (c) The major stress component S22.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

The phase distribution at t=64 s. (a) The phase fraction of ferrite-pearlite. (b) The phase fraction of austenite.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

The history of stresses at the final state, considering the phase transformation and transformation induced plasticity or not. (a) The region that is considered (along the welding line). (b) The von Mises stress. (c) The major stress component S22.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In