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Research Papers

Microplane Model for Fracturing Damage of Triaxially Braided Fiber-Polymer Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
Ferhun C. Caner

Institute of Energy Technologies, Technical University of Catalonia, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Spainferhun.caner@upc.edu

Zdeněk P. Bažant

 Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, CEE/A135, Evanston, IL 60208z-bazant@northwestern.edu

Christian G. Hoover

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208christianhoover2010@u.northwestern.edu

Anthony M. Waas

Department of Aeronautical Engineering, University of Michigan, 3044 FXB Building, 1320 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109dcw@umich.edu

Khaled W. Shahwan

Chrysler Technology Center, Chrysler Group LLC, Auburn Hills, MI 48326-2757kws8@chrysler.com

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 133(2), 021024 (Mar 24, 2011) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003102 History: Received November 16, 2009; Revised September 16, 2010; Published March 24, 2011; Online March 24, 2011

A material model for the fracturing behavior for braided composites is developed and implemented in a material subroutine for use in the commercial explicit finite element code ABAQUS . The subroutine is based on the microplane model in which the constitutive behavior is defined not in terms of stress and strain tensors and their invariants but in terms of stress and strain vectors in the material mesostructure called the “microplanes.” This is a semi-multiscale model, which captures the interactions between inelastic phenomena such as cracking, splitting, and frictional slipping occurring on planes of various orientations though not the interactions at a distance. To avoid spurious mesh sensitivity due to softening, the crack band model is adopted. Its band width, related to the material characteristic length, serves as the localization limiter. It is shown that the model can realistically predict the orthotropic elastic constants and the strength limits. More importantly, the present model can also fit the tests of size effect on the strength of notched specimens and the post-peak behavior, which have been conducted for this purpose. When used in the ABAQUS software, the model gives a realistic picture of the axial crushing of a braided tube by a divergent plug.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Constitutive law for the matrix: (a) strength envelope in the biaxial stress plane and (b) bilinear softening law

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Figure 3

The geometry of the specimens and loading configuration of the size effect tests conducted (for small, medium, and large sizes, the dimensions were D=76.2 mm,152.4 mm, and 304.8 mm; L=241.3 mm, 482.6 mm, and 965.2 mm; L′=196.85 mm, 393.7 mm, and 787.4 mm; a=12.7 mm, 25.4 mm, and 50.8 mm; the out-of-plane thickness t=7.62 mm for all sizes)

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Figure 4

Results from size effect tests of large-size, medium-size, and small-size 2DTBC specimens with an inclination angle ϕ=30 deg of inclined braids and their simulation by microplane model for 2DTBC

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Figure 5

Results from size effect tests of large-size, medium-size, and small-size 2DTBC specimens with an inclination angle ϕ=45 deg of inclined braids and their simulation by microplane model for 2DTBC

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Figure 6

Results from size effect tests of large-size, medium-size, and small-size 2DTBC specimens with an inclination angle ϕ=60 deg of inclined braids, compared with computer results with the microplane model for 2DTBC

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Figure 7

Stress distribution in (a) small-size, (b) medium-size, and (c) large-size 2DTBC specimens with an inclination angle ϕ=30 deg of inclined braids as predicted by microplane model for 2DTBC (the figures are scaled to the same width, and the finite element sizes were the same for all specimen sizes; S22 is the normal stress perpendicular to notch plane)

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Figure 8

Stress distribution in (a) small-size, (b) medium-size, and (c) large-size 2DTBC specimens with an inclination angle ϕ=45 deg of inclined braids as simulated by microplane model for 2DTBC (the figures are scaled to the same width, and the finite element sizes were the same for all specimen sizes; S22 is the normal stress perpendicular to notch plane)

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Figure 9

Stress distribution in (a) small-size, (b) medium-size, and (c) large-size 2DTBC specimens with an inclination angle ϕ=60 deg of inclined braids as simulated by microplane model for 2DTBC (the figures are scaled to the same width, and the finite element sizes were the same for all specimen sizes; S22 is the normal stress perpendicular to notch plane)

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Figure 10

Prediction by the model of the compact tension test (of a specimen made of 2DTBC with an inclination angle ϕ=30 deg of inclined braids as shown in Fig. 1)

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Figure 11

The opening mode stress distribution in the compact tension test specimen immediately after the peak load

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Figure 12

The cross section of the setup for the crushing of tube specimens made of 2DTBC using a steel plug

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Figure 13

Results from crush tests of tubes made of 2DTBC specimens with an inclination angle ϕ=30 deg of inclined braids and their simulation by microplane model for 2DTBC

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Figure 14

Stress distribution in the tube after the plug displacement of 14 mm as obtained by microplane model for 2DTBC

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Figure 1

The geometry of RUC for the 2DTBC and its idealization in microplane model

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