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MULTI-PHYSICS APPROACHES FOR THE BEHAVIOR OF POLYMER-BASED MATERIALS

Coupling of Nanocavitation With Cyclic Deformation Behavior of High-Density Polyethylene Below the Yield Point

[+] Author and Article Information
Kamel Hizoum

 Institute of Mechanics of Fluids and Solids UMR 7507 UdS/CNRS, 2 rue Boussingault, F-67000 Strasbourg, France; LTI, Public Research Centre Henri Tudor, 66, rue de Luxembourg, L-4221 Esch-Sur-Alzette, Luxembourg

Yves Rémond

 Institute of Mechanics of Fluids and Solids UMR 7507 UdS/CNRS, 2 rue Boussingault, F-67000 Strasbourg, France

Stanislav Patlazhan1

 Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 4, Kosygin Street, 119991 Moscow, Russia

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 133(3), 030901 (Jun 23, 2011) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004047 History: Received April 10, 2010; Revised March 10, 2011; Published June 23, 2011; Online June 23, 2011

The peculiarities of viscoelastic behavior of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) subjected to the uniaxial cyclic tensions and retractions below the yield point are studied. This required using three different deformation programs including (i) the successive increase in strain maximum of each cycle, (ii) the controlled upper and lower stress boundaries, and (iii) the fixed strain at the backtracking points. The experimental data are analyzed in a framework of the modified structure-sensitive model (Oshmyan , 2006, “Principles of Structural–Mechanical Modeling of Polymers and Composites,” Polym. Sci. Ser. A, 48, pp. 1004–1013) of semicrystalline polymers. It is supposed that increase in the interlamellar nanovoid volume fraction results in speeding-up the plastic flow rate while decreasing cavitation rate. Consequently, a proper fitting of the stress–strain cyclic diagrams is obtained for the applied deformation programs within the common set of model parameters. This makes it possible to reveal evolution of nanovoid volume fraction in HDPE during cyclic deformations.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Basic structural-mechanical element under tensile drawing

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Figure 2

Uniaxial cyclic stress-strain diagram of HDPE with monotonic growth of strain maximums with the fixed increment Δɛ≅0.0022 and strain rate |ɛ·|=5×10-4s-1. Symbols and solid lines correspond to experimental data and numerical simulation, respectively. The inset represents the last cycle.

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Figure 4

Uniaxial cyclic stress-strain diagram of HDPE with the fixed strain maximum ɛmax=0.0305 and strain rate |ɛ·|=5×10-4s-1. Symbols and solid lines correspond to experimental data and numerical simulation, respectively. The inset represents the last cycle.

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Figure 5

Evolution of nanovoid volume fractions accompanying uniaxial cyclic drawing of HDPE corresponding to (a) a free cyclic loading and unloading, (b) the stress-controlled, and (c) the strain-controlled programs, which are represented in Figs. 24, respectively.

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Figure 3

Uniaxial cyclic stress-strain diagram of HDPE with the controlled maximum σmax=17.2MPa and minimum σmin=2.14MPa stresses and fixed strain rate |ɛ·|=5×10-4s-1. Symbols and solid lines correspond to experimental data and numerical simulation, respectively. The inset represents the last cycle.

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