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MULTI-PHYSICS APPROACHES FOR THE BEHAVIOR OF POLYMER-BASED MATERIALS

Measuring the Influence of Temperature on the Development of Elastic Anisotropy With Compressive Plastic Flow for Glassy Polycarbonate

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Goel, J. A. Turner

Department of Engineering Mechanics,  University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0526

Y. Wen

Department of Engineering Mechanics,  University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0526; School of Mathematics and Physics,  University of Science and Technology, Beijing, China 086-10083

J. Hein

M. Negahban1

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 133(3), 030902 (Jun 23, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004048 History: Received April 14, 2010; Revised March 17, 2011; Published June 23, 2011; Online June 23, 2011

The development of anisotropy as a result of isothermal plastic deformation below the glass transition temperature is investigated for different deformation temperatures. Initially, isotropic polycarbonate was subjected to different extents of plastic strain in compression and the developed anisotropic wave speeds were measured using time of travel ultrasonic techniques. Longitudinal wave speeds were measured both in the axial and transverse direction of compression for different deformation temperatures. The wave moduli clearly indicated the development of a transversely elastic response as a result of uniaxial compression.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Density measured as a function of temperature and plastic strain for PC. Elevated temperature density measurements were based on using a weighing method at room temperature and adjustment bye either ARAMIS stereo-optical strain measurements for the undeformed samples and direct dimensional measurements for the deformed samples.

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Figure 3

Description of the pulse-echo method [12]

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Figure 4

Room temperature longitudinal wave speed in PC subjected to different amounts of plastic compression

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Figure 5

Axial and transverse longitudinal wave speed of undeformed PC and its density

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Figure 6

Axial and transverse longitudinal wave moduli of undeformed PC

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Figure 7

Axial longitudinal wave speed as a function of plastic strain for isothermally compressed PC

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Figure 11

Axial and transverse longitudinal wave speeds as a function of plastic strain measured at room temperature for all samples of PC

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Figure 12

Axial and transverse longitudinal wave modulus as a function of plastic strain measured at room temperature for all samples of PC

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Figure 10

Transverse longitudinal wave modulus as a function of plastic strain for isothermally compressed PC

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Figure 9

Axial longitudinal wave modulus as a function of plastic strain for isothermally compressed PC

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Figure 8

Transverse longitudinal wave speed as a function of plastic strain for isothermally compressed PC

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Figure 1

Axial and transverse moduli reported as a function of the extent of plastic deformation in tension for PVC, PMMA, PS, and PC (from Ward [1]). The axial modulus Ea increases while the transverse modulus Et decreases with an increase in the plastic strain.

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