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MULTI-PHYSICS APPROACHES FOR THE BEHAVIOR OF POLYMER-BASED MATERIALS

Dynamic Mechanical Properties of PMMA/Organoclay Nanocomposite: Experiments and Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
Rodrigue Matadi Boumbimba

 IMFS, University of Strasbourg, 2 Rue Boussingault, 67000 Strasbourg, France

Said Ahzi

 IMFS, University of Strasbourg, 2 Rue Boussingault, 67000 Strasbourg, France; TEMA,  Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal

Nadia Bahlouli1

 IMFS, University of Strasbourg, 2 Rue Boussingault, 67000 Strasbourg, France e-mail: nadia.bahlouli@unistra.fr

David Ruch

 LTI, Public Research Center Henry Tudor, 70 Rue de Luxembourg, L-4221 Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg

José Gracio

 TEMA, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 133(3), 030908 (Jul 18, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004052 History: Received May 18, 2010; Revised March 03, 2011; Published July 18, 2011; Online July 18, 2011

Similarly to unfilled polymers, the dynamic mechanical properties of polymer/organoclay nanocomposites are sensitive to frequency and temperature, as well as to clay concentration. Richeton (2005, “A Unified Model for Stiffness Modulus of Amorphous Polymers Across Transition Temperatures and Strain Rates,” Polymer, 46, pp. 8194–8201) has recently proposed a statistical model to describe the storage modulus variation of glassy polymers over a wide range of temperature and frequency. In the present work, we propose to extend this approach for the prediction of the stiffness of polymer composites by using two-phase composite homogenization methods. The phenomenological law developed by Takayanagi , 1966, J. Polym. Sci., 15, pp. 263–281 and the classical bounds proposed by Voigt, 1928, Wied. Ann., 33, pp. 573–587 and Reuss and Angew, 1929, Math. Mech., 29, pp. 9–49 models are used to compute the effective instantaneous moduli, which is then implemented in the Richeton model (Richeton , 2005, “A Unified Model for Stiffness Modulus of Amorphous Polymers Across Transition Temperatures and Strain Rates,” Polymer, 46, pp. 8194–8201). This adapted formulation has been successfully validated for PMMA/cloisites 20A and 30B nanocomposites. Indeed, good agreement has been obtained between the dynamic mechanical analysis data and the model predictions of poly(methyl-methacrylate)/organoclay nanocomposites.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 5

Models predictions of the storage modulus as function of temperature for PMMA/C20A and PMMA/C30B nanocomposites

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Figure 6

Model prediction of the he storage modulus as function of temperature for the PMMA/C30B nanocomposites at a frequency of 1 Hz, (a) at 3 wt. % of organoclay concentration and (b) at 5 wt. % of organoclay concentration

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Figure 7

Model prediction of the storage modulus as function of temperature for the PMMA/C20A nanocomposite at a frequency of 1 Hz: (a) at 3 wt. % of organoclay concentration and (b) at 5 wt. % of organoclay concentration

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Figure 8

Model prediction and experimental data of the storage modulus as function of temperature for PMMA/C30B nanocomposites at different frequencies

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Figure 9

Model prediction and experimental data of the storage modulus as function of temperature for PMMA/C20A nanocomposites at different frequencies

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Figure 4

Storage modulus versus temperature of both PMMA/C20A and PMMA/C30B at different organoclay concentrations and at a frequency of 1 Hz

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Figure 3

Experimental results for the storage modulus of PMMA/C20A and PMMA/C30B organoclay nanocomposites at different frequencies

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Figure 2

Experimental results for the storage modulus of PMMA at different frequencies

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Figure 1

TEM images of PMMA organoclay nanocomposites at high magnification: (a) PMMA/C30B and (b) PMMA/C20A, showing the exfoliated and intercalated morphology, respectively

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