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Research Papers

An Instantaneous Power of Strain Approach to the Calculation of Elastoplastic Strain Energy Density in SUS 304 Steel

[+] Author and Article Information
Cyprian T. Lachowicz1

Department of Mechanics and Machine Design,  Opole University of Technology, Mikolajczyka 5, 45-271 Opole, Poland e-mail: c.lachowicz@po.opole.pl

Dorian S. Lachowicz

 Faculty of Mechanics, Opole University of Technology, Mikolajczyka 5, 45-271 Opole, Poland

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 133(3), 031007 (Jul 18, 2011) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003778 History: Received November 15, 2010; Revised March 06, 2011; Published July 18, 2011; Online July 18, 2011

Presenting a method of identifying and calculating the elastoplastic strain energy density with the instantaneous power of strain, authors of this paper propose using it as a fatigue life/parameter for materials prone to nonproportional cyclic hardening effect.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Method of calculating nonproportional material hardening coefficient αNP

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Figure 2

Method of calculating a nonproportionality factor fNP

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Figure 3

Method of calculating the elastic-plastic strain energy density by the integrating the time course of instantaneous power

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Figure 4

Basic shape and dimensions of the examined sample

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Figure 5

Nonproportional strain paths

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Figure 6

Stabilized hysteresis loops for SUS 304 grade steel specimens that undertook uniaxial loadings for selected values form strain range Δɛ=0.5% and 1.5%

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Figure 7

Example presenting the method of identifying the work of internal and external forces for strain Path 3. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 8

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 1 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 9

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 2 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 10

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 3 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 11

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 4 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 12

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 5 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 13

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 6 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 14

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 7 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 15

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 8 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 16

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 9 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 17

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 10 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 18

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 11 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 19

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 12 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 20

Stabilized hysteresis loops for strain Path No. 13 together with calculated instantaneous power histories for both tension pσ and torsion pτ. Time, expressed with t and scaled in seconds, is calculated as a product of the number n of each instantaneous value and time step Δt for stress and strain sampling.

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Figure 21

Fatigue life as a function of plastic strain energy density ΔWt=ΔWp

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Figure 22

Fatigue life as a function of plastic strain energy density ΔWt=(1+αNPfNP)(ΔWp)

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Figure 23

Fatigue life as a function of elastoplastic strain energy density ΔWt=ΔWp+ΔWe+

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Figure 24

Fatigue life as a function of elastoplastic strain energy density ΔWt=(1+αNPfNP)(ΔWp+ΔWe+)

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Figure 25

Fatigue life as a function of elastoplastic strain energy density ΔWt=(1+αNPfNP)(ΔWp+ΔWe-)

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