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Research Papers

Influence of Al Particle Size and Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) Volume Fraction on the Dielectric Properties of PZT-Epoxy-Aluminum Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Banerjee

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Rutgers,  The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8058

K. A. Cook-Chennault

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Rutgers,  The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8058; Center of Advanced Energy Systems, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8058

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 133(4), 041016 (Oct 20, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004812 History: Received March 14, 2011; Accepted July 22, 2011; Published October 20, 2011; Online October 20, 2011

Two-phase PZT-epoxy piezoelectric composites and three phase PZT-epoxy-Al composites were fabricated using a poling voltage of 0.2 kV/mm. The influence of aluminum inclusion size (nano and micron) and (lead zirconate titanate) PZT volume fraction on the dielectric properties of the three phase PZT-epoxy-aluminum composites were experimentally investigated. In general, dielectric and piezoelectric properties of the PZT-epoxy matrix were improved with the addition of aluminum particles. Composites that were comprised of micron scale aluminum inclusions demonstrated higher piezoelectric d33 -strain-coefficients, and higher dielectric loss compared to composites that were comprised of nanosize aluminum inclusions. Specifically, composites comprised of micron sized aluminum particles and PZT volume fractions of 20%, 30%, and 40% had dielectric constants equal to 405.7, 661.4, and 727.8 (pC/N), respectively, while composites comprised of nanosize aluminum particles with the same PZT volume fractions, had dielectric constants equal to 233.28, 568.81, and 657.41 (pC/N), respectively. The electromechanical properties of the composites are influenced by several factors: inclusion agglomeration, contact resistance between particles, and air voids. These composites may be useful for several applications: structural health monitoring, energy harvesting, and acoustic liners.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Plot of the effective dielectric constant of the two-phase composite, ɛ, as a function of PZT volume fraction

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

SEM micrographs of two-phase (PZT/epoxy) composite with PZT volume fraction of 50% and magnifications of (a) 1000 and (b) 5000

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Figure 3

A comparison of the dielectric constants of the two-phase and three phase microcomposite and nanocomposite

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Figure 4

A comparison of the dielectric loss of the three phase microcomposite and nanocomposite with the two-phase PZT-epoxy composite with increasing PZT volume fraction shows that microcomposites have the highest dielectric loss a compared to the nanocomposite and two-phase composite

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

A comparison of the piezoelectric strain coefficient d33 of the three phase microcomposite and nanocomposite with the two-phase PZT-epoxy composite with increasing PZT volume fraction. Microcomposites have the highest dielectric loss as compared to the nanocomposite and two-phase composite.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

SEM micrographs of PZT-epoxy-Al microcomposite with PZT volume fraction of 50% and magnifications of (a) 1000 and (b) 5000

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

SEM micrographs of PZT-epoxy-Al microcomposite with PZT volume fraction of 50% and magnifications of (a) 1000 and (b) 5000

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