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BRIDGING MICROSTRUCTURE, PROPERTIES, AND PROCESSING OF POLYMER-BASED ADVANCED MATERIALS

Investigation on Modified Humic Substances Based Binders for Iron Ore Agglomeration

[+] Author and Article Information
Guihong Han1

 School of Minerals Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083, PR. Chinaguihong-han@hotmail.com

Tao Jiang2

 School of Minerals Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083, PR. Chinajiangtao@mail.csu.edu.cn

Guanghui Li

 School of Minerals Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083, PR. Chinaliguangh@mail.csu.edu.cn

Yanfang Huang

 School of Minerals Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083, PR. Chinahlele114@163.com

Yuanbo Zhang

 School of Minerals Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083, PR. Chinasintering@mail.csu.edu.cn

1

MATS-11-1058, Han, Page 1. These authors contributed equally to this work as co-first authors.

2

MATS-11-1058, Han, Page 1. These authors contributed equally to this work as co-first authors.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 134(1), 010901 (Dec 12, 2011) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005407 History: Received March 22, 2011; Revised October 13, 2011; Accepted October 15, 2011; Published December 12, 2011; Online December 12, 2011

Characterization of modified humic substances based binders for iron ore agglomeration was examined by chemical analysis, optical density, Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR), and thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TG–DSC). Chemical analysis displays the proportion of fulvic acid (FA) to humic acid (HA) in the binder is 1:10. Compared with the HA, the FA possesses more functional groups. Meantime, optical density ratio analysis shows that the molecular weight and aromatization degree of the FA are smaller than those of the HA. FTIR spectra further confirm aromatic and aliphatic fractions are associated with various types of oxygen-rich groups including carboxyl and hydroxyl groups. TG–DSC and chemical analysis indicate structural changes of the binder including thermal decomposition, dehydroxylation and/or decarboxylation are caused during heating. The structural characterization of the binder ensures its good performance in the field of iron ore agglomeration.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

XRD pattern of the ash of the MHA binder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Visible spectrum of the organic components in the MHA binder

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Figure 3

FTIR spectra of FA and HA in the MHA binder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

(a) The TG-DSC curves of FA in the MHA binder. (b) The TG-DSC curves of HA in the MHA binder.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

(a) The curves of chemical groups of the FA with the changes of heating temperature. (b) The curves of chemical groups of the HA with the changes of heating temperature.

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