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BRIDGING MICROSTRUCTURE, PROPERTIES, AND PROCESSING OF POLYMER-BASED ADVANCED MATERIALS

Amorphous and Semicrystalline Blends of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) and Poly(methyl methacrylate): Characterization and Modeling of the Mechanical Behavior

[+] Author and Article Information
J. L. Halary1

 Laboratoire de Sciences et Ingénierie de la Matière Molle (UMR 7615), Ecole Supérieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris (ESPCI ParisTech), 10 rue Vauquelin, 75231 Paris cedex 05, Francejean-louis.halary@espci.fr

J. Jarray, M. Fatnassi, F. Ben Cheikh Larbi

 Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques (IPEST), BP51, 2070 La Marsa, Tunisia

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 134(1), 010910 (Dec 21, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005411 History: Received April 13, 2011; Revised July 29, 2011; Published December 21, 2011; Online December 21, 2011

After extensive studies starting in the 1970s in relation to miscibility and piezoelectric properties, the blends of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) have been revisited with the aim of assessing their mechanical behavior. Depending on the amount of PVDF, either amorphous or semicrystalline blends are produced. Typically, the blends remain amorphous when their PVDF content does not exceed 40 wt. %. Blend composition influence on the values of the glass transition temperature, Tg , and on its mechanical expression, Tα , is extensively discussed. Then, emphasis is put on the stress-strain behavior in tension and compression over the low deformation range covering the elastic, anelastic, and viscoplastic response. The reported data depend, as expected, on temperature and strain rate and also, markedly, on blend composition and degree of crystallinity. Molecular arguments, based on the contribution of the glass transition motions are proposed to account for the observed behavior. Thanks to the understanding of phenomena at the molecular level, accurate models can be selected in the view of mechanical modeling.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Influence of blend composition on the degree of crystallinity (after [5])

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Figure 2

Use of the JH equation to model the composition dependence of Tg FM in PVDF/PMMA amorphous blends

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Figure 3

Use of the JH equation to model the composition dependence of Tg FM in PVDF/PMMA semicrystalline blends

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Figure 4

Evolution of Tg FM as a function of ΦF (amorphous materials) or ΦF a (semicrystalline materials)

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Figure 5

Relation between the degree of crystallinity χ and the calculated value of Tg FM for the blend before any crystallization, Tg FM 0

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Figure 6

Typical stress-strain curve of amorphous blends under compression (F/M 40:60, ɛ· = 2 × 10−3   s−1 )

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Figure 7

Blend composition influence on the stress-strain curves under compression recorded at (Tg FM - Ttest ) = 25 K

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Figure 8

Link between the extent of anelastic domain and plastic strain softening amplitude

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Figure 9

Comparison of stress-strain curves under compression and under tension (F/M 30:70, ɛ· = 2 × 10−3   s−1 , Ttest  = 50 °C)

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Figure 10

Typical stress-strain curve of semicrystalline blends under compression (F/M 60:40, ɛ· = 2 × 10−3   s−1 , Ttest  < Tg FM )

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Figure 11

Typical stress-strain curve of semicrystalline blends under compression (F/M 60:40, ɛ· = 2 × 10−3   s−1 , Tg FM  < Ttest   < Tm F )

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Figure 12

Optical micrograph of crazes formed in the necking zone of a strained PVDF/PMMA blend

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Figure 13

Blend composition dependence of the volume strain (ɛ = 0.06 (Tg FM –Ttest ) = 7 K)

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Figure 14

Influence of strain rate on the shape of stress-strain curves

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Figure 15

Blend composition dependence of the activation volume [(Tg FM - Ttest ) = 25 K]

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