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Research Papers

Interaction of Edge Dislocation With Stacking Fault Tetrahedron in Cu

[+] Author and Article Information
Jianfeng Jin

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269

Hanchen Huang1

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269hanchen@uconn.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 134(1), 011007 (Dec 08, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005266 History: Received July 26, 2011; Revised September 12, 2011; Published December 08, 2011; Online December 08, 2011

This paper reports an anomaly in the yield strength of dislocation interacting with stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) in Cu, reveals atomic mechanisms that are responsible for the anomaly, and further shows the thermodynamic driving force for the atomic mechanisms to prevail. Instead of monotonically increasing with the area of intersection cross-section, the yield strength first increases and then decreases with the area. The decrease, or the anomaly, is due to a change of atomic mechanism of the interactions—the SFT goes through a morphological transformation. The thermodynamic driving force for the transformation derives from the competition between the elastic energy of dislocations and the stacking fault energy.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of simulation cell in three dimensions (a) and in two dimensions (b)

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Figure 2

(a) The stress–strain curve from the MS and MD simulations; and (b) yield strength as a function of cross-sectional area of the intersection plane (or the distance from an apex of the SFT as indicated by the position of intersection plane, in the unit of atomic layer)

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Figure 3

Four stages of dislocation-SFT interactions as the intersection plane is near the apex; here it is sixth atomic layer of the SFT. Purple/black balls represent atoms at dislocation core and green/gray balls atoms at stacking fault.

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Figure 4

Four stages of dislocation-SFT interactions as the intersection plane are near the base; here it is tenth atomic layer of the SFT. Purple/black balls represent atoms at dislocation core and green/gray balls atoms at stacking fault.

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Figure 5

Schematic of dislocations (lines) and stacking faults (planes), before and after the SFT transformation shown in Fig. 4

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Figure 6

Energy change upon SFT transformation when the intersection plane changes from apex to base

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Figure 7

Yield strength dependence on simulation cell size; for five cells of different x × y × z dimensions (in the unit of nm3 )

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Figure 8

(a) Yield strength for two temperatures T = 10 K and 300 K and (b) yield strength for different SFT sizes

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