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Research Papers

The Contribution of History in Plastic Behavior of Metals in Machining

[+] Author and Article Information
M. R. Vaziri1

Department of Engineering,  University of Kashan,P.O. Box 87317-51167, Kashan, Isfahan, Iranvaziri@kashanu.ac.ir

M. Mashayekhi

Mechanical Engineering Department,  Isfahan University of Technology, P.O. Box 84156-83111, Isfahan, Iranmashayekhi@cc.iut.ac.ir

M. Salimi

Mechanical Engineering Department,  Isfahan University of Technology, P.O. Box 84156-83111, Isfahan, Iransalimi@cc.iut.ac.ir

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 134(2), 021007 (Mar 27, 2012) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006179 History: Received July 24, 2011; Revised February 16, 2012; Published March 26, 2012; Online March 27, 2012

Mechanical and thermal properties significantly affect many aspects of machining, such as chip formation, cutting forces, cutting temperatures, and surface integrity of machined products. One of the most important mechanical properties is the material flow stress, which is governed by the field variables including the strain, strain rate, and temperature. Due to the presence of high values of these variables in machining, it is important to evaluate the performance of different material models, typically developed at much lower strains, strain rates, and temperatures. The other issue is to identify the effect of the history of these variables that material microvolume experiences while moving through the shear zones and include them in the model. It is demonstrated that such material models may be suitable choices to describe the material flow in simulation of machining, which leads to an extrapolation from the mathematical form of these models. In addition, this paper discuses the importance of history dependency in flow stress and compares the performance of three commonly employed material constitutive models including the nonhistory-dependent Johnson–Cook (J–C) model, the empirical Oxley model, and the history-dependent Maekawa model. It is demonstrated that among the metals with different crystal structures, the flow stress of face-centered cubic (FCC) metals is highly affected by the strain path and is very little sensitive to temperature and strain-rate changes. In addition, the magnitudes of these effects are discussed.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Geometry of updated Lagrangian model

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Figure 2

Photograph of the experimental system (with permission from Ivester [21])

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Figure 3

Temperature map of orthogonal cutting for cutting condition of Table 6 (with permission from Ivester [21])

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Figure 4

Temperature and strain rate along the strain path

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Figure 5

Flow stress along the strain path for α-brass (FCC metal)

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Figure 6

Flow stress along the strain path for AISI 1045 steel (BCC metal)

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Figure 7

Flow stress along the strain path for Ti-6Al-4V alloy (HCP metal)

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Figure 8

Temperature along primary deformation zone

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Figure 9

Temperature along secondary deformation zone

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Figure 10

Equivalent strain along primary deformation zone

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Figure 11

Equivalent strain along secondary deformation zone

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Figure 12

Flow stress along primary deformation zone

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Figure 13

Flow stress along secondary deformation zone

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