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Research Papers

Stress Analysis and Structural Optimization of a Three-Layer Composite Cladding Tube Under Thermo-Mechanical Loads

[+] Author and Article Information
S.-S. Zhou

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Texas A&M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3123

X.-L. Gao1

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080-3021Xin-Lin.Gao@utdallas.edu

G. W. Griffith

Department of Reactor Physics Analysis & Design,Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 3870, Idaho Falls, ID 83415

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 134(3), 031001 (May 07, 2012) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006510 History: Received July 25, 2011; Revised February 16, 2012; Published May 04, 2012; Online May 07, 2012

A general solution for the stress and strain fields in a three-layer composite tube subjected to internal and external pressures and temperature changes is first derived using thermo-elasticity. The material in each layer is treated as orthotropic, and the composite tube is regarded to be in a generalized plane strain state. A three-layer ZRY4-SiCf /SiC-SiC composite cladding tube under a combined pressure and thermal loading is then analyzed and optimized by applying the general solution. The effects of temperature changes, applied pressures, and layer thickness on the mechanical behavior of the tube are quantitatively studied. The von Mises’ failure criterion for isotropic materials and the Tsai-Wu’s failure theory for composites are used, respectively, to predict the failure behavior of the monolithic ZRY4 (i.e., Zircaloy-4) inner layer and SiC outer layer and the composite SiCf /SiC core layer of the three-layer tube. The numerical results reveal that the maximum radial and circumferential stresses in each layer always occur on the bonding surfaces. By adjusting the thickness of each layer, the effective stress in the three-layer cladding tube under the prescribed thermal-mechanical loading can be changed, thereby making it possible to optimally design the cladding tube.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Problem configuration

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Figure 2

Effect of temperature on (a) the thermal conductivity and (b) the strength of Zircaloy-4

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Figure 3

Stresses and radial displacement (normalized by the inner radius) in the tube wall at various ambient temperatures: To  = Ti  = 200 °C (dotted line), 400 °C (dashed line) and 600 °C (solid line). Note that the temperature is uniform in the tube wall. The ZRY4, SiCf /SiC and SiC layers are indicated in blue, green and red, respectively (see the online version).

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Figure 4

Stresses and radial displacement (normalized by the inner radius) in the tube wall under various thermal loads: Ti  = 200 °C (dotted line), 400 °C (dashed line) and 600 °C (solid line), with To fixed at 100 °C. The ZRY4, SiCf /SiC and SiC layers are indicated in blue, green and red, respectively (see the online version).

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Figure 5

Maximum effective stress in each layer of the tube varying with the temperature on the inner surface: (a) uniform temperature distribution with To  = Ti and (b) steady-state heat flow with To fixed at 25 °C.

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Figure 6

Maximum values of the stress components and effective stress varying with the thermal conductivity of the SiCf /SiC layer krr(2)

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Figure 7

Effect of layer thickness on the maximum effective stress of (a) the ZRY4 layer, (b) the SiCf /SiC layer, and (c) the SiC layer

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Figure 8

Effect of layer thickness on the safety factor: (a) the ZRY4 layer, (b) the SiCf /SiC layer, and (c) the SiC layer

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