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Research Papers

A Simplified Micromechancial Model for Analyzing Viscoelastic–Viscoplastic Response of Unidirectional Fiber Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
Jaehyeuk Jeon

Mechanical Engineering Department, Texas A&M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3123

Anastasia Muliana1

Mechanical Engineering Department, Texas A&M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3123amuliana@tamu.edu

We shall eliminate the superscript t in this Appendix in order to simplify writing the equations. It should be noted that the field variables and subcells’ consistent tangent stiffness matrices vary with time.

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 134(3), 031003 (May 07, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006508 History: Received September 21, 2011; Revised February 27, 2012; Published May 04, 2012; Online May 07, 2012

This study introduces a simplified micromechanical model for analyzing a combined viscoelastic–viscoplastic response of unidirectional fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The micromechanical model is derived based on a unit-cell model consisting of fiber and matrix subcells. In this micromechanical model, a limited spatial variation of the local field variables in the fiber and matrix subcells is considered in predicting the overall time-dependent response of composites. The constitutive model for the polymer matrix is based on Schapery’s viscoelastic and Perzyna’s viscoplastic models. An incremental stress–strain relation is considered in solving the time-dependent and inelastic response. A linearized prediction and iterative corrector scheme are formulated to minimize errors from the linearization within the incremental stress–strain relation such that both the micromechanical constraints and the nonlinear constitutive equations are satisfied. The goal is to provide the accurate effective stress–strain relations of the composites and the corresponding viscoelastic and viscoplastic deformation in the polymeric matrix. The micromechanical model is verified by comparing the time-dependent response of the glass FRP composites having several off-axis fiber orientations with experimental data available in the literature.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Creep strain for [0]m laminate. (o) experiment strain data, (—) calculated viscoelastic strain. Applied stress = 130 MPa (fiber direction).

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Figure 3

Creep strain for [90]m laminate. (o) experiment strain data, (—) calculated viscoelastic strain. Applied stress = 50 MPa (transverse of fiber direction).

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Figure 4

Creep strain for [45]m laminate. Applied stress is local direction.

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Figure 5

Creep strain for [30]m laminate. Applied stress is local direction.

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Figure 6

Creep strain for [20]m laminate. Applied stress is local direction.

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Figure 7

Hardening parameters of Perzyna model (calibrated from the viscoplastic creep strains)

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Figure 8

Creep-recovery strain for [0]m laminate at various fiber volume contents

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Figure 1

A Representative unit-cell model

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Figure 9

Creep-recovery strain for [90]m laminate at various fiber volume contents

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Figure 10

Creep-recovery strain for [45]m laminate at various fiber volume contents

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