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Research Papers

A Finite Temperature Multiscale Interphase Zone Model and Simulations of Fracture

[+] Author and Article Information
Lisheng Liu

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,  The University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720;Department of Engineering Structure and Mechanics,  Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, 430070, P.R. China

Shaofan Li1

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,  The University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720shaofan@berkeley.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 134(3), 031014 (Jun 11, 2012) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006583 History: Received September 30, 2011; Revised February 28, 2012; Published June 11, 2012; Online June 11, 2012

In this work, an atomistic-based finite temperature multiscale interphase finite element method has been developed, and it has been applied to study fracture process of metallic materials at finite temperature. The coupled thermomechanical finite element formulation is derived based on continuum thermodynamics principles. The mesoscale constitutive relations and thermal conduction properties of materials are enriched by atomistic information of the underneath lattice microstructure in both bulk elements and interphase cohesive zone. This is accomplished by employing the Cauchy–Born rule, harmonic approximation, and colloidal crystal approximation. A main advantage of the proposed approach is its ability to capture the thermal conduction inside the material interface. The multiscale finite element procedure is performed to simulate an engineering nickel plate specimen with weak interfaces under uni-axial stretch. The simulation results indicate that the crack propagation is slowed down by thermal expansion, and a cooling region is found in the front of crack tip. These phenomena agree with related experimental results. The effect of different loading rates on fracture is also investigated.

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Figures

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Figure 1

The unit cell for 2D hexagonal lattice

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Figure 2

Deformation of the interphase zone

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Figure 3

Linear quadrilateral element for the interphase zone

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Figure 4

Finite element mesh

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Figure 5

Temperature distribution at time 0.14 μs (V0 : 100 m/s, T0 : 293 K)

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Figure 6

Temperature distribution at different time (V0 : 100 m/s, T0 : 293 K)

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Figure 7

Stress (σ22 ) distribution at different time (0.83027 × 107 Pa) (V0 : 100 m/s, T0 : 293 K)

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Figure 8

Thermal stress (σ22 ) distribution at different time (0.83027 × 107 Pa) (V0 : 100 m/s, T0 : 293 K)

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Figure 10

Temperature distribution at different time (V0 : 400 m/s, T0 : 293 K)

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Figure 11

Stress (σ22 ) distribution at different time (0.83027 × 107 Pa) (V0 : 400 m/s, T0 : 293 K)

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Figure 12

Thermal stress (σ22 ) distribution at different time (0.83027 × 107 Pa) (V0 : 400 m/s, T0 : 293 K)

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Figure 13

Stress (σ22 ) distribution at time 0.08 μs (0.83027 × 107 Pa) (T0 : 293 K)

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Figure 14

Stress (σ22 ) distribution at time 0.16 μs for different crack length (0.83027 × 107 Pa) (T0 : 293 K, V0  = 100 m/s)

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Figure 9

Temperature distribution at time 0.084 μs (V0 : 400 m/s, T0 : 293 K)

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