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Research Papers

Nonlinear Stress–Strain Characterization of Cast Iron Used to Manufacture Pipes for Water Supply

[+] Author and Article Information
Balvant Rajani1

Rajani Consultants, Inc., 2024 Glenfern Avenue Ottawa, ON, K1J 6G8, CanadaBalvant.Rajani@gmail.com

1

Formally at Principal Research Officer, National Research Council Canada (NRC), 1200 Montreal Road, Building M-20, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0R6.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 134(4), 041005 (Aug 24, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007213 History: Received August 05, 2011; Revised May 29, 2012; Published August 24, 2012; Online August 24, 2012

The stress–strain response of cast iron under tension or compression is nonlinear. This paper examines how the hyperbolic constitutive law can be applied to characterize nonlinear stress–strain behavior of cast iron used in water supply networks. Procedures are described to obtain parameters of the hyperbolic constitutive law from either the response (data) obtained from simple uniaxial tensile and compressive tests or from bending tests. To demonstrate its applicability, this hyperbolic constitutive law is first applied to data obtained from uniaxial tensile and compressive tests conducted by Schlick and Moore (1936, “Strength and Elastic Properties of Cast Iron in Tension, Compression, Flexure, and Combined Tension and Flexure,” Bulletin 127, Iowa Engineering Experiment Station, Ames, IA). In addition, an approach to extract parameters for the hyperbolic constitutive law from bending (beam and pipe rings) tests is proposed and subsequently applied to tests conducted by Talbot (1908, “Tests of Cast-Iron and Reinforced Concrete Culvert Pipe,” Bulletin No. 22, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL). This latter approach is attractive for practical purposes because the test set up is simple and the test coupons are very easy to prepare. The hyperbolic constitutive law in conjunction with maximum normal strain theory as proposed by St. Venant (Collins, J. A., 1993, Failure of Materials in Mechanical Design: Analysis, Prediction, Prevention, John Wiley, New York, NY) was also used to predict failure loads.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Hyperbolic and transformed representations for stress-strain characteristics of cast iron

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Figure 2

Stress-strain relation for test coupon N2-090

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Figure 3

Strain and stress distributions across pipe wall thickness

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Figure 4

Loading cases to determine pipe deflection

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Figure 5

Load-deflection response of three-point beam bending test (coupon 991-4, Ref. [20]): comparisons of observed response with linear and nonlinear predictions

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Figure 6

Load-diameter change response of two-point ring bending test (coupon 991A—spigot end, Ref. [20]): comparisons of observed response with linear and nonlinear predictions

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Figure 7

Load-diameter change response of two-point ring bending test (coupon 997B—spigot end, Ref. [20]): comparisons of observed response with linear and nonlinear predictions

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