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Research Papers

Coupled Thermomechanical Modeling of Small Volume FCC Metals

[+] Author and Article Information
Danial Faghihi

Research Assistant

George Z. Voyiadjis

Boyd Professor
e-mail: voyiadjis@eng.lsu.edu
Computational Solid Mechanics Laboratory,
Department of Civil and
Environmental Engineering,
Louisiana State University,
Baton Rouge, LA 70803

Taehyo Park

Professor
Department of Civil Engineering,
Hanyang University,
Seoul 133-791, Republic of Korea;
Department of Civil and
Environmental Engineering,
Louisiana State University,
Baton Rouge, LA 70803
e-mail: cepark@hanyang.ac.kr

The computation was performed with the aid of the matlab program.

The effect of different values of the time scale and the total time is investigated in Fig. 5.

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology. Manuscript received May 28, 2012; final manuscript received January 14, 2013; published online March 25, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Xi Chen.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 135(2), 021003 (Mar 25, 2013) (17 pages) Paper No: MATS-12-1113; doi: 10.1115/1.4023771 History: Received May 28, 2012; Revised January 14, 2013

The mechanical and thermal behavior of small volume metallic compounds on the fast transient time are addressed in this work through developing a thermodynamically consistent nonlocal framework. In this regard, an enhanced gradient plasticity theory is coupled with the application of the micromorphic approach to the temperature variable. The yield function of the VA–FCC (Voyiadjis Abed Face Centered Cubic) model based on the concept of thermal activation energy and the dislocations interaction mechanisms including nonlinear hardening is taken into consideration in the derivation. The effect of the material microstructural interface between two materials is also incorporated in the formulation with both temperature and rate effects. In order to accurately address the strengthening and hardening mechanisms, the theory is developed based on the decomposition of the mechanical state variables into energetic and dissipative counterparts which provided the constitutive equations to have both energetic and dissipative gradient length scales for the bulk material and the interface. Moreover, the nonlocal evolution of temperature is addressed by incorporating the microstructural interaction effect in the fast transient process using two time scales in the microscopic heat equation.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) Load–displacement curve showing the grain boundary pop-in, and (b) typical hardness–displacement curve showing the hardening/softening effect

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Fig. 8

(a) and (b): distribution of the normalized plastic strain across the normalized film thickness, (c) and (d): normalized stress versus the applied strain, and (e) and (f): distribution of the normalized temperature across the normalized film thickness. Size effects due to the interfacial length scales are described for the cases of (a), (c), and (e) for different values of LIen while LIdis = 0.2 and (b), (d), and (f) for different values of LIdis while LIen = 0.2. In all cases Len = Ldis = 0.2.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

(a) and (b): distribution of the normalized plastic strain across the normalized film thickness, and (c) and (d) normalized stress versus the applied strain. Size effects due to the bulk length scales are described for the case of (a) and (c) for different values of Len while Ldis = 0.0 and (b) and (d) for different values of Ldis while Len = 0.0. In all curves T0 = 296 K and the TI= T0 thermalizing boundary condition is assumed for the generalized heat equation.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Distribution of the normalized temperature across the normalized film thickness. (a) and (b) constant temperature at interface (TI|x=0=T0); (c) and (d): no heat flow at interface (T,xI|x=0=0). Size effects due to the bulk length scales are described for the case of (a) and (c) for different values of Len while Ldis = 0.0 and (b) and (d) for different values of Ldis while Len = 0.0.

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Fig. 4

Size effect on the temperature due to the bulk length scale: (a) variation of the normalized temperature with different Len and Ldis at the free surface for the case of constant temperature at interface (TI|x=0=T0); and (b) variation of the normalized temperature with different Ldis at the free surface and interface for the case of no heat flow at interface (T,xI|x=0=0).

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Fig. 5

Distribution of the normalized temperature across the normalized film thickness for the case of constant temperature at interface (TI|x=0=T0). Rate effects due to the time scales are described for the case of (a) different values of τen/t while τdis/t = 0 and (b) different values of τdis/t while τen/t = 0.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Distribution of the normalized temperature across the normalized film thickness for the case of constant temperature at interface (TI|x=0=T0). Rate effects due to the time scales are described for the case of (a) different values of τen/t while τdis/t = 0 and (b) different values of τdis/t while τen/t = 0.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Distribution of the normalized plastic strain and temperature across the normalized film thickness. Size effect due to the bulk length scale are described for the case of (a) and (c) for different values of Len while Ldis = 0.0 and (b) and (d) for different values of Ldis while Len = 0.0.

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