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Research Papers

Viscoelastic Responses of Silicone-Rubber-Based Magnetorheological Elastomers Under Compressive and Shear Loadings

[+] Author and Article Information
L. Z. Sun

e-mail: lsun@uci.edu
Department of Civil and
Environmental Engineering,
University of California,
Irvine, CA 92697

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology. Manuscript received June 4, 2012; final manuscript received December 7, 2012; published online March 25, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Xi Chen.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 135(2), 021008 (Mar 25, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: MATS-12-1133; doi: 10.1115/1.4023839 History: Received June 04, 2012; Revised December 07, 2012

Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are adaptive composite materials in the sense that their mechanical properties are tailored by the applied magnetic field. In this paper we developed both isotropic and anisotropic silicone-rubber-based MREs. We examined the zero-magnetic-field dynamic stiffness and damping along with the magnetic field induced changes (the magnetorheological (MR) effect) for the viscoelastic properties of the MREs by conducting both compression and shear investigations. While the anisotropic MREs exhibited substantial magnetic-field-dependent viscoelastic properties at a medium magnetic field, the isotropic ones showed a negligible MR effect. The magnetic filler structure and concentration, loading frequency, and dynamic strain amplitude were all confirmed to play significant roles in the dynamic mechanical performance of the MREs.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Scanning electron micrographs of (a) the isotropic MRE with 20 vol. % filler concentration, and (b) the anisotropic MRE with 20 vol. % filler concentration. The arrow indicates the direction of the filler alignment.

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Fig. 2

The configurations for the dynamic mechanical analysis of MREs in (a) the compression test, and (b) the shear test. Arrows indicate the direction of the applied magnetic fields.

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Fig. 3

Frequency scans of the zero-magnetic-field: (a) storage Young's moduli, and (b) loss factors under compressive loading. The dynamic strain amplitude is 1%.

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Fig. 4

Frequency scans of the zero-magnetic-field: (a) storage shear moduli, and (b) loss factors under shear loading. The dynamic strain amplitude is 1%.

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Fig. 5

Dynamic strain sweeps of the zero-magnetic-field: (a) storage Young's moduli, and (b) loss factors under compressive loading. The testing frequency is 10 Hz.

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Fig. 6

Dynamic strain sweeps of the zero-magnetic-field (a) storage shear moduli, and (b) loss factors under shear loading. The testing frequency is 10 Hz.

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Fig. 7

Frequency scans of both the absolute and relative MR effect on (a) the storage Young's modulus, and (b) the loss factors under compressive loading at the magnetic flux density of 0.1 T. The dynamic strain amplitude is 1%.

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Fig. 8

Frequency scans of both the absolute and relative MR effect on (a) the storage shear modulus, and (b) the loss factors under shear loading at the magnetic flux density of 0.2 T. The dynamic strain amplitude is 1%.

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Fig. 9

Dynamic strain sweeps of both the absolute and relative MR effect on (a) the storage Young's modulus, and (b) the loss factors under compressive loading at the magnetic flux density of 0.1 T. The testing frequency is 10 Hz.

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Fig. 10

Dynamic strain sweeps of both the absolute and relative MR effect on (a) the storage shear modulus, and (b) the loss factors under shear loading at the magnetic flux density of 0.2 T. The testing frequency is 10 Hz.

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