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Technical Brief

Static Recovery Activation Energy of Pure Aluminum at Room Temperature

[+] Author and Article Information
Yeh An-Chou

Department of Mechanical and
Automation Engineering,
I-Shou University,
Kaohsiung 84001, Taiwan
e-mail: yehac@mx.nthu.edu.tw

Chuang Ho-Chieh

Department of Mechanical and
Automation Engineering,
I-Shou University,
Kaohsiung 84001, Taiwan
e-mail: ha_ma_su@yahoo.com.tw

Kuo Chen-Ming

Department of Mechanical and
Automation Engineering,
I-Shou University,
Kaohsiung 84001, Taiwan
e-mail: cmkuo@isu.edu.tw

1Present address: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan.

2Present address: C.S. Aluminium Corporation, No. 17 Tung Lin Road, Siaogang, Kaoshiung 81260, Taiwan.

3Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received September 17, 2013; final manuscript received February 17, 2014; published online March 25, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Marwan K. Khraisheh.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 136(3), 034501 (Mar 25, 2014) (4 pages) Paper No: MATS-13-1172; doi: 10.1115/1.4026938 History: Received September 17, 2013; Revised February 17, 2014

Thermally activated energy, which varies linearly with static recovered strain, is calculated from static recovery experiments of pure aluminum initially plastically deformed by strain-rate-controlled tensile tests up to 10% engineering strain at room temperature. The activation energy at the initial static recovery is 20 kJ mol−1, which is much less than that of pure copper and attributed to the dislocation annihilation by glide or cross-slip as well as higher stacking fault energy. Once dislocation annihilation processes are exhausted, more energy is required for subgrains to form and then grow. Eventually the recovered strain is slowed down and gradually saturated.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Tensile stress–strain behavior of pure aluminum

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Time dependent static recovered strain at 298 K of the specimens initially strained to 10% at 0.05 and 0.0005 s−1 strain rates

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Total recovered strain after 7 days at different temperatures of the specimens initially strained to 10% at 0.05 and 0.0005 s−1 strain rates

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Time to reach 0.01%–0.09% recovered strains versus 1/T plots of the specimens initially strained to 10% at 0.05 s−1 strain rate

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Static recovery activation energy of pure aluminum near room temperatures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Time-dependent dislocation morphology of the tensile test specimens initially strained to 10% at 0.05 s−1 strain rate after being kept for (a) 1 day, (b) 3 days, and (c) 5 days inside a moisture-proof chest at room temperature

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