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Research Papers

High Temperature Flow Behavior and Microstructure of Al-Cu/Mg2Si Metal Matrix Composite

[+] Author and Article Information
A. H. Shafieizad

Hot Deformation and Thermo-Mechanical
Processing of High Performance Engineering
Materials Laboratory,
School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering,
College of Engineering,
University of Tehran,
Tehran 0098-14395-515,Iran
e-mail: a.shafieizad@ut.ac.ir

A. Zarei-Hanzaki

Hot Deformation and Thermo-Mechanical
Processing of High Performance Engineering
Materials Laboratory,
School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering,
College of Engineering,
University of Tehran,
Tehran 0098-14395-515, Iran
e-mail: zareih@ut.ac.ir

M. Ghambari

School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering,
College of Engineering,
University of Tehran,
Tehran 0098-14395-515, Iran
e-mail: mgambari@ut.ac.ir

A. Abbasi-Bani

Hot Deformation and Thermo-Mechanical
Processing of High Performance Engineering
Materials Laboratory,
School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering,
College of Engineering,
University of Tehran,
Tehran 0098-14395-515, Iran
e-mail: abasibani@ut.ac.ir

1 Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received May 18, 2014; final manuscript received November 24, 2014; published online January 20, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Tetsuya Ohashi.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 137(2), 021006 (Apr 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: MATS-14-1107; doi: 10.1115/1.4029410 History: Received May 18, 2014; Revised November 24, 2014; Online January 20, 2015

The present work deals with the high temperature flow behavior and the microstructure of the Al-Cu/Mg2Si metal matrix composite. Toward this end, a set of hot compression tests was performed in a wide range of temperature (573–773 K) and strain rate (0.001–0.1 s−1). The results indicated that the temperature and strain rate have a significant effect on the flow softening and hardening behavior of the material. The work hardening rate may be offset due to the occurrence of the restoration processes, the dynamic coarsening, and spheroidization of the second phase particles. In this regard, two phenomenological constitutive models, Johnson–Cook (JC) and Arrhenius-type equations, were employed to describe the high temperature deformation behavior of the composite. The JC equation diverged from experimental curves mainly in conditions which are far from its reference temperature and reference strain rate. This was justified considering the fact that JC model considers thermal softening, strain rate hardening, and strain hardening as three independent phenomena. In contrast, the Arrhenius-type model was more accurate in modeling of the flow behavior in wide range of temperature and strain rate. The minor deviation at some specified conditions was attributed to the negative strain rate sensitivity of the alloys at low temperature deformation regime.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The optical microstructure of as-received in situ Al-Cu matrix composite

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Fig. 2

The flow curves obtained from hot compression pretests at the constant strain rate of 0.01 s−1

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Fig. 3

The comparisons between the frictionless and measured true stress–true strain curves at different temperature under strain rates of: (a) 0.001 s−1, (b) 0.01 s−1, and (c) 0.1 s−1

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Fig. 4

The microstructures of Al-Cu/Mg2Si composite deformed to the true strain of 0.6 under various deformation conditions. (a) 573 K, 0.1 s−1, (b) 673 K, 0.1 s−1, and (c) 723 K, 0.1 s−1.

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Fig. 5

The microstructures of Al-Cu/Mg2Si composite deformed to the true strain of 0.6 under various deformation conditions. (a) 723 K, 0.001 s−1, (b) 723 K, 0.01 s−1, and (c) 723 K, 0.1 s−1.

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Fig. 6

The variation of ln (A − σ0) versus ln ε for temperature of 573 K and strain rate of 0.001 s−1

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Fig. 7

The variation of σ/(A + Bɛn) versus ln (ɛ·/ɛ·0) for temperature of 573 K and testing strain rates at different strains

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Fig. 8

The variation of ln [1 − σ/(A + Bɛn)] versus ln T* for strain rate of 0.001 s−1 and testing temperatures at different strains

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Fig. 9

Comparisons between measured and predicted flow stress by original JC model with strain rates of: (a) 0.001 s−1, (b) 0.01 s−1, and (c) 0.1 s−1

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Fig. 10

Evaluating the value of (a) n1 by plotting ln σ versus ln ɛ. and (b) β by plotting σ versus ln ɛ.

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Fig. 11

Evaluating the value of (a) n by plotting ln (sinh(ασ)) versus ln ɛ. and (b) Q by plotting ln (sinh(ασ)) versus 1000/T

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Fig. 12

The variation of (a) ln A, (b) Q, (c) n, and (d) α with true strain

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Fig. 13

The comparisons between predicted (black circles) and measured flow stress curves (solid lines) of Al-Cu/Mg2Si experimental in situ composite at strain rates of (a) 0.001 s−1, (b) 0.01 s−1, and (c) 0.1 s−1

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Fig. 14

The correlation between the experimental and predict flow stress data from the proposed. (a) Arrhenius-type equation and (b) JC model, over the entire range of strain, strain rate, and temperature.

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Fig. 15

Relative error histogram of: (a) Arrhenius-type model and (b) JC model

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