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Research Papers

Modeling of Microstructure Effects on the Mechanical Behavior of Ultrafine-Grained Nickels Processed by Severe Plastic Deformation by Crystal Plasticity Finite Element Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Thê-Duong Nguyen

Faculty of Civil Engineering,
Duy Tân University,
25/K7, Quang Trung,
Da Nang 55000, Vietnam
e-mail: theduong.nguyen@duytan.edu.vn

Van-Tung Phan

R&D Institute,
Duy Tân University,
25/K7, Quang Trung,
Da Nang 55000, Vietnam
e-mail: phanvantung@dtu.edu.vn

Quang-Hien Bui

R&D Institute,
Faculty of Civil Engineering,
Duy Tân University,
25/K7, Quang Trung,
Da Nang 55000, Vietnam
e-mails: quanghien.bui@duytan.edu.vn, buiquanghien@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received April 20, 2014; final manuscript received January 7, 2015; published online February 2, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Irene Beyerlein.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 137(2), 021010 (Apr 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: MATS-14-1085; doi: 10.1115/1.4029570 History: Received April 20, 2014; Revised January 07, 2015; Online February 02, 2015

In this study, a crystal plasticity finite element model (CPFEM) has been revisited to study the microstructure effects on macroscopic mechanical behavior of ultrafine-grained (UFG) nickels processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD). The microstructure characteristics such as grain size and dislocation density show a strong influence on the mechanical behavior of SPD-processed materials. We used a modified Hall–Petch relationship at grain level to study both grain size and dislocation density dependences of mechanical behavior of SPD-processed nickel materials. Within the framework of small strain hypothesis, it is quite well shown that the CPFEM predicts the mechanical behavior of unimodal nickels processed by SPD methods. Moreover, a comparison between the proposed model and the self-consistent approach will be shown and discussed.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) 3D Voronoi FE mesh of a cube 1 × 1 × 1 including 50 tessellations and (b) applied boundary conditions

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Fig. 2

Hall–Petch relation for nickel consolidated from different processing routes [27,31,71-73]. The straight line represents a linear fit on data from Refs. [72] and [73].

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Fig. 3

Fitted curve of the Hall–Petch relationship: (a) stress–strain relation for step 1 with τ∞C=3.077 MPa and k0 = 2600 MPa × nm−1 and (b) comparison of flow stresses to existing data obtained by FEM simulation for step 1

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Fig. 4

(a) True stress–true strain curves of SPD-processed nickels and (b) comparison of flow stresses

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Fig. 5

Distribution of plastic strain (-) at different states of deformation (a) 0.01, (b) 0.025, and (c) 0.04 predicted by CPFEM for all grains and for 15 random grains of RVE model

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Fig. 6

Distribution of von Mises stress (MPa) at different states of deformation: (a) 0.01, (b) 0.025, and (c) 0.04, predicted by CPFEM for all grains and for 15 random grains of the RVE model

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