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Research Papers

Thermomechanical Fatigue of Mar-M247: Extension of a Unified Constitutive and Life Model to Higher Temperatures

[+] Author and Article Information
K. A. Brindley, M. M. Kirka, P. Fernandez-Zelaia

The George W. Woodruff School of
Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332

R. W. Neu

The George W. Woodruff School of
Mechanical Engineering;
School of Materials Science and Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: rick.neu@gatech.edu

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received January 29, 2014; final manuscript received February 19, 2015; published online March 11, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Said Ahzi.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 137(3), 031001 (Jul 01, 2015) (14 pages) Paper No: MATS-14-1022; doi: 10.1115/1.4029908 History: Received January 29, 2014; Revised February 19, 2015; Online March 11, 2015

The predictive capability of the Sehitoglu–Boismier unified constitutive and life model for Mar-M247 Ni-base superalloy is extended from a maximum temperature of 871 °C to 1038 °C. The unified constitutive model suitable for thermomechanical loading is adapted and calibrated using the response from isothermal cyclic experiments conducted at temperatures from 500 °C to 1038 °C at different strain rates with and without dwells. The flow rule function and parameters as well as the temperature dependence of the evolution equation for kinematic hardening are established. Creep and stress relaxation are critical to capture in this elevated temperature regime. The coarse-grained polycrystalline microstructure exhibits a high variability in the predicted cyclic response due to the variation in the elastic response associated with the orientation of the crystallographic grains. The life model accounts for fatigue, creep, and environmental damage under both isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF).

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References

Boismier, D. A., and Sehitoglu, H., 1990, “Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue of Mar-M247: Part 1—Experiments,” ASME J. Eng. Mater. Technol., 112(1), pp. 68–79. [CrossRef]
Neu, R. W., and Sehitoglu, H., 1989, “Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue, Oxidation and Creep Part I: A Study of Damage Mechanisms,” Metall. Trans. A, 20(9), pp. 1755–1767. [CrossRef]
Neu, R. W., and Sehitoglu, H., 1989, “Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue, Oxidation and Creep Part II: A Life Prediction Model,” Metall. Trans. A, 20(9), pp. 1769–1783. [CrossRef]
Sehitoglu, H., and Boismier, D. A., 1990, “Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue of Mar-M247: Part 2—Life Prediction,” ASME J. Eng. Mater. Technol., 112(1), pp. 80–89. [CrossRef]
Slavik, D., and Sehitoglu, H., 1987, “A Constitutive Model for High Temperature Loading Part I—Experimentally Based Forms of the Equations,” Thermal Stress, Material Deformation, and Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, pp. 65–73.
Slavik, D., and Sehitoglu, H., 1987, “A Constitutive Model for High Temperature Loading Part II—Comparison of Simulations With Experiments,” Thermal Stress, Material Deformation, and Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, pp. 75–82.
Fernandez-Zelaia, P., 2012, “Thermomechanical Fatigue Crack Formation in Nickel-Base Superalloys at Notches,” Master's thesis, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.
Slavik, D., and Cook, T. S., 1990, “A Unified Constitutive Model for Superalloys,” Int. J. Plast., 6(6), pp. 651–664. [CrossRef]
Kuhn, H. A., and Sockel, H. G., 1988, “Comparison Between Experimental Determination and Calculation of Elastic Properties of Nickel-Base Superalloys Between 25 and 1200 °C,” Phys. Status Solidi A, 110(2), pp. 449–458. [CrossRef]
Simulia Corp., 2011, Abaqus v. 6.11-1, Dassault Systèmes, Providence, RI.
McGinty, R. D., 2001, “Multiscale Representation of Polycrystalline Inelasticity,” Ph.D. thesis, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA.

Figures

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Fig. 1

Optical microscopy image of microstructure exposed with Kalling's Etchant No. 1

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Fig. 2

Experimentally determined flow rule function

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Fig. 3

Temperature dependence of backstress hardening coefficients. (a) Back stress hardening coefficient aα. (b) Back stress hardening coefficient bα.

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Fig. 4

IF experimental data and model predictions. (a) 500 °C, (b) 871 °C, (c) 927 °C, (d) 982 °C, and (e) 1038 °C.

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Fig. 5

Dwell experimental data and model predictions. (a) 871 °C, (b) 927 °C, (c) 982 °C, and (d) 1038 °C.

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Fig. 6

Variation in elastic modulus as a function of temperature. Equations shown in Table 8.

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Fig. 7

IF experimental data and model prediction at 500 °C with mean modulus

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Fig. 8

Comparison of modulus bounds predicted by Mar-M002 at a temperature of 500 °C and strain rate of 5 × 10−3 s−1

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Fig. 9

TMF experimental data and model verification over a temperature range of 500–1038 °C with a large strain range. (a) OP TMF at 10 cycle half-life and (b) IP TMF at 10 cycle half-life.

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Fig. 10

TMF experimental data and model verification over a temperature range of 500–1038 °C with a small strain range. (a) OP TMF at 460 cycle half-life and (b) IP TMF at 190 cycle half-life.

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Fig. 11

3D thermomechanical boundary value problem. (a) Temperature contour plot ( °C). (b) Mises stress contour plot (MPa). (c) Effective plastic strain contour plot (—).

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Fig. 12

Creep phasing factor

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Fig. 13

Damage interaction for OP TMF at 427–927 °C with fixed 60 s cycle time

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Fig. 14

Damage interaction for IP TMF at 427–982 °C with fixed 60 s cycle time

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Fig. 15

Damage interaction at 927 °C under isothermal loading with a strain rate of 5.0 × 10−3 s−1

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Fig. 16

Damage interaction at 871 °C under isothermal loading with dwells at a strain rate of 5.0 × 10−4 s−1

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Fig. 17

IF life predictions and experimental life data. (a) Low temperature and (b) high temperature.

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Fig. 18

Dwell life predictions and experimental life data

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Fig. 19

TMF life predictions and experimental life data. (a) OP TMF and (b) IP TMF.

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Fig. 20

Predicted variability in total life as a function of extremes in possible modulus values

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