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Research Papers

Low-Temperature Sintering of ZnO–TiO2 Ceramics

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhengwei Nie

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211
e-mail: znhc5@mail.missouri.edu

Yuyi Lin

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211
e-mail: LinY@missouri.edu

Feixue Wang

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Yanshan University,
Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004, China
e-mail: fxwang@ysu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Materials Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY. Manuscript received September 30, 2014; final manuscript received April 3, 2015; published online May 8, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Harley Johnson.

J. Eng. Mater. Technol 137(3), 031010 (Jul 01, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: MATS-14-1184; doi: 10.1115/1.4030412 History: Received September 30, 2014; Revised April 03, 2015; Online May 08, 2015

Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) was chosen as a sintering aid to lower the sintering temperature of the ZnO–TiO2 system. The effect of V2O5 on the sintering behavior and material properties of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics and cermets made of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics and copper (Cu) was investigated as a function of V2O5 percentage and sintering temperature. Densities and hardness of the specimens were improved with an increase of V2O5 up to 2 wt. %. The sintering temperature of the specimens can be reduced to below 1000 °C. The properties of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics and cermets made from ZnO–TiO2 ceramics and Cu with V2O5 are strongly dependent on the sintering temperature. The density of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics and cermets was increased up to 95%, 90% of theoretical density at 900–920 °C, 960–1000 °C, respectively, for 4 hrs.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The block diagram of ceramics preparation

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Fig. 2

The block diagram of cermets preparation

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Fig. 3

Specimens made of (a) ZnO and TiO2 and (b) ZnO, TiO2, and Cu in this study

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Fig. 4

Bulk densities of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics related to sintering temperature

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Fig. 5

Hardness of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics related to sintering temperature

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Fig. 6

Bulk densities of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics as a function of amount of V2O5 and sintering temperature

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Fig. 7

Hardness of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics added 2 wt. % V2O5 addition related to sintering temperature

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Fig. 8

XRD patterns of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics sintered (a) with V2O5 at 900 °C and (b) without V2O5 at different temperatures

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Fig. 9

SEM micrographs of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics sintered or 4 hrs at (a) 880 °C and (b) 900 °C with 2 wt. % V2O5

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Fig. 10

Relative densities of cermets as a function of amount of Cu and sintering temperature

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Fig. 11

Cermets specimen with 80 wt. % Cu after sintering

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Fig. 12

Hardness of cermets with 80 wt. % Cu as a function of sintering temperature

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Fig. 13

SEM micrographs of cermets made of ZnO–TiO2 ceramics and 80 wt. % Cu sintered for 4 hrs with 2 wt. % V2O5 addition at: (a) 880 °C and (b) 920 °C

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